Digital Rangefinder

Displaying 1 to 14 of 14 matches.
duncan1890
Member is a Black Diamond contributor and has more than 200,000 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 125 Audio downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 4:50AM
Epson have produced the first Digital Rangefinder the R-D1 looks like an interesting camera.

What do people think?

Never used a rangefinder myself, but it looks intriguing

(Edited on 2005-02-04 04:55:05 by duncan1890)
kickstand
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 7:01AM
I was skeptical until I saw the swivel-out monitor. I could certainly see the need for a high-quality camera with interchangeable lenses and swivel-out monitor. Great for self-portraits, waist-level shooting and such.

The price of $3000 is a bit steep compared to a 20D, but is actually quite reasonable for a Leica-mount rangefinder with a digital sensor.

The proof is in the pudding, of course, but it sounds like a promising product and a useful tool. Maybe I'll get one ... in ten years.

thumbnail
mortennorbyclosed
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 7:12AM
I was skeptical until I saw the swivel-out monitor. I could certainly see the need for a high-quality camera with interchangeable lenses and swivel-out monitor. Great for self-portraits, waist-level shooting and such.

And macros!
TrebaffettiCLOSED
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Illustrator
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 10:37AM
Why no dSLR got that wonderful swiveling monitor, that any cheap point-n-shoot camera has?

Its really a plus being able to shoot without having to physically connect your head with the camera body.
mortennorbyclosed
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 10:47AM

Why no dSLR got that wonderful swiveling monitor, that any cheap point-n-shoot camera has?

Because the mirror is blocking the path from the lens to the sensor, which is why it has to swing up before the shutter opens. This mechanism is what gives the short "blackout" in the viewfinder when you release the shutter.

OK, so that was the standard answer. An added advantage of this arrangement is that the sensor does not have to be on all the time, thereby staying cooler. Cooler sensor = less noise, all other things being equal.
iceninephoto
Member is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 12:54PM

Epson have produced the first Digital Rangefinder the R-D1 looks like an interesting camera.

What do people think?

Never used a rangefinder myself, but it looks intriguing

(Edited on 2005-02-04 04:55:05 by duncan1890)


I think this camera is revolutionary. Noise and image quality in line with a DSLR. This camera would fill a huge niche if not for the terribly high price.

If I were a working PJ I would own this box in a heartbeat
kickstand
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 1:57PM

I think this camera is revolutionary. Noise and image quality in line with a DSLR. This camera would fill a huge niche if not for the terribly high price.


1: how do you know the quality is in line with a DSLR?
2: How do you figure the price is "terribly high"? Price for a film-based Leica is comparable, and the R-D1 comes with a lifetime supply of film, if you will. By contrast, DSLR's are double the cost (or more) of comparable film SLR's.

(Edited on 2005-02-04 02:03:17 by kickstand)
duncan1890
Member is a Black Diamond contributor and has more than 200,000 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 125 Audio downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 3:48PM
Just been reading a review of it in digital photographer magazine. This is what they say about it.

Features 9 out of 10
All the photographic control you'd need in a rangefinder camera. The viewfinder faming needs to accommodate shorter focal lengths though.

Build Quality 10 out of 10
You might quibble about the lightness of a couple of controls, but otherwise the quality of constrution is immaculate.

Handling 7 out of 10
Both good and bad. The focusing, apeture and shutter speed selection systems are superb, but the menu nav is fiddly.

Quality of results 8 out of 10
Definition will depend on lens, but exposure accuracy and white bal are good.

Value for money 7 out of 10
Hefty price tag which will appeal to a very targeted market.

So it looks like it is a good camera, but a tad over priced.
alexh
Member is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Fri Feb 4, 2005 5:36PM
My old Konica rangefinder is one of favourite cameras - whisper quiet and super fast. Focusing with a rangefinder is very accurate when you get the hang of it. I call it my "poor man's Leica".

When I decided to invest in a decent Digital camera I went for the Olympus c5060, partly because I come from an Olynpus SLR background and aslo after reading this article.

Interestingly the c5060 has a good swivel screen too.
iceninephoto
Member is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Sat Feb 5, 2005 2:20PM

1: how do you know the quality is in line with a DSLR?
2: How do you figure the price is "terribly high"? Price for a film-based Leica is comparable, and the R-D1 comes with a lifetime supply of film, if you will. By contrast, DSLR's are double the cost (or more) of comparable film SLR's.

(Edited on 2005-02-04 02:03:17 by kickstand)


1- Phil Askey took a look at the box, and he liked it. A description of the camera shows that it uses a sensor similar to what you'll find in a DSLR. Put a good lens on it, and you'll probably have something special

2- The price is terrible high *for me*. This camera fills a niche market, they're not gonna sell many of them. That makes it expensive.

Cheers

kycstudio
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Illustrator
Posted Wed Feb 9, 2005 1:22PM
I think that this kind of cameras are showing the future.
When small non slr cameras could acommodate changeable lenses with fast accurate auto focus this does not have)
Crisp and clean image due to bigger sensors
Real time swivel lcds + Rangefinder viewers
Anti shake systems like video cameras.
There will be no reason to use an SLR.
And all of us will benefit from smaller "whisper quiet" cameras.

The panasonic lumix is very interesting too. It has some extraordinary features, although it has a small sensor and one fixed lens (a very good one).
Merge this two cameras and you will see part of the future.
shapecharge
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto IllustratorExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Thu Feb 10, 2005 4:45AM
What is the difference between this and the imacon camera ?
kycstudio
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Illustrator
Posted Thu Feb 10, 2005 5:56AM
This is small and portable.
kickstand
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Thu Feb 10, 2005 6:53AM
Aheinzen is correct. To elaborate, the Imacon looks like it is a digital back for Hasselblad medium-format cameras. The R-D1 is a Leica-compatible rangefinder. The Hasselblad is more suited for studio use, the Leica is famously used for grabbing the "decisive moment" in the street.

Both of these brands -- Leica and Hasselblad -- have a devoted following among serious photographers, and have a built-in audience for those who already have lenses & accessories, and who want to go digital.

P.S. One of the big drawbacks of film rangefinders is that you can't preview the actual image being taken. The viewfinder has a certain amount of parallax error. With the R-D1, it would seem this is eliminated if you use the monitor.

(Edited on 2005-02-10 07:00:57 by kickstand)
This thread has been locked.
Displaying 1 to 14 of 14 matches.
Not a member?Join