Attention: These forums are no longer active. The iStock Contributor forums have moved to the Contributor Community site.

Exposure on isolated backgrounds

Displaying 1 to 12 of 12 matches.
similarlee
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Wed Feb 9, 2005 1:00AM
I've been shooting some tabletop photography on a white background. I'm having problems getting good exposure off the camera. I have an HP 945. It's a decent consumer camera, but lacks a full manual mode. I keep the same settings, but my shots look really inconsistent and underexposed. I have a set of 2x500w hotlights and one 350w light. In these pictures I was just using the 500w lamps. I did a custom white balance. After color correcting and retouching in PS I can make them look good, but i'm trying to cut down on post-processing. And I'm already having issues with noise, so I dont want to introduce more noise by so much editing.

Here's two shots before editing:
th_hammer1
th_spork
And one after editing: (this is in the que now)
th_bear2

any advice would be much appreciated. thanks in advance!

(Edited on 2005-02-09 01:39:41 by similarlee)
frankwright
Member is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Wed Feb 9, 2005 1:29AM
Camera meters resolve the light they measure to a tone that is 18% grey which is the tone of the background in image 1 (it is also the tone of grass and skin). This is why photos that are predominantly white or black come out either under or over exposed.

The answer is to increase the amount of light entering the camera by opening the aperture by perhaps 1 to 2 stops more than the camera's meter is indicating.

Another way is to meter using an 18% grey card first and keep these setting for the intended shot or even at a pinch to meter the back of your hand first.
JSABBOTT
Member is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Wed Feb 9, 2005 4:14AM
See if you can you change the meter in your camera from "whole scene" to spot meter (most better point and shoots allow this). If so, you can expose for the dark part of the hammer handle. That will slightly over-expose your background leaving it bright white. Play with it, and have fun.
jallfree
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Illustrator
Posted Wed Feb 9, 2005 10:56AM
Have you read THIS article. It helped me a lot. Makes you understand why white turns out grey! Helped me out a lot with my isolated shots.

I took this shot using the backlighting technique and from what I remember didn't have to do any adjustments on the computer afterwards.

file_thumbview_approve



(Edited on 2005-02-09 11:02:01 by jallfree)
similarlee
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Wed Feb 9, 2005 11:23AM
thanks for all the tips! I'm anxious to get home and try some new stuff out.

Jailfree-I had seen that article before, but forgot about it. Thanks for reminding me! I think it will be very useful.
Quirex
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Sat Feb 12, 2005 3:27AM
Does your cam have RAW?

(Edited on 2005-02-12 03:35:58 by Quirex)
similarlee
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Sat Feb 12, 2005 11:57AM
no it doesnt...i wish it did. but hopefully by the end of the year i'll have a 20D and that should eliminate a lot of my problems.
kickstand
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Sat Feb 12, 2005 6:30PM
I've done a few of this type of photo. Your hammer looks fine, just needs some Photoshop work. Your spork is underexposed. Your bear looks fine except that you cropped the shadow on the right side.

Some tips:

1) For these kinds of shots, bracket your exposures a lot, at 1/3-stop increments if you can. You don't need a spot meter, or any kind of meter, really, if your lighting setup is always the same. If you're shooting digitally, the results are immediate, the cost is nil.
2) If you can, place your object on a translucent white plastic with backlighting; that will blow out the background to white with just one click of the white eyedropper in your CURVES adjustment.
3) If you don't have a backlit background, you can always photoshop out the background to pure white; no harm in that.
4) 20D or digicam, makes no difference in terms of getting a white background. No need to shoot RAW, either, since you are in control of all the variables.

(Edited on 2005-02-12 06:36:27 by kickstand)
similarlee
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:16AM
thanks a lot kickstand. the bear did get rejected for "over filtering." I'm guessing that has something to do with the shadow being cropped.
Quirex
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Wed Feb 16, 2005 2:37AM
over filtering generally means too much photoshop, that it actually becomes obvious.

Selective colour adjustment on whites only is also awesome.
LizV
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 125 Audio downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloads
Posted Wed Feb 16, 2005 6:25AM
Selective colour adjustment on whites only is also awesome.


I'd say it's nothing short of a miracle! Since I discovered this little feature a few weeks ago, I've been amazed at the results.

kickstand
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Wed Feb 16, 2005 11:42AM

Selective colour adjustment on whites only is also awesome.


I'd be careful with selective color adjustment. If your whites are, say, too blue then that means your lighting is too blue. And that means your subject is too blue. And that means you need to do a global color adjustment.
This thread has been locked.
Displaying 1 to 12 of 12 matches.
Not a member?Join