noise included Y/N

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Alfsky
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Posted Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:37PM
Really new to digi cameras and ive posted before about the amount of noise rejections ive had.Can I ask,as a newbie is there a rule of thumb about the amount of noise thats acceptable or unacceptable.Im checking my shots at 100% but the amount of noise varies.This makes me unsure about running the shot through Noise Community or not.Ive done this and been rejected for to smooth a shot...doh!!.Cheers for your comments in advance
alfsky
spxChrome
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Posted Mon Feb 21, 2005 2:40PM
Try the online Tutorial, which you probally already know about.

Or you could post some sample shots in the critque forum.

Also, you could try burning a few credits and download some photos for comparison from some of the veterans here, this will give you a way to gauge quality.

Hope this helps, btw - what type of camera do you have? Can you control the ISO settings?

(Edited on 2005-02-21 02:45:34 by spxChrome)
Alfsky
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Posted Mon Feb 21, 2005 3:46PM
ive got a fuji s7000,I can get ISO 160 in auto but only 200 in manual.Ive contacted fuji but all they said was use 200 and set the sharpness to soft!.Not a lot of help really,thanx for replying
Justified
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Posted Mon Feb 21, 2005 5:37PM
Alfsky, I too have the S7000 and have just stated uploading to this site in the last week. It is becoming increasingly apparent that noise is always going to be something to be mindful of with the Fuji.
I got my camera about a month ago having decided to take up photography as a hobby, then stumbled upon some stock sites whilst looking for photography advice. Anyway I uploaded some of my favourite shots (which at the time I was very impressed with) and that's when the noise issue reared it's ugly head. As a result I have a lot of great pictures that I took before knowing about the issue that will never see the light of day.
Here are some of the things I am now doing that I wasn't always before:
1. Shoot in RAW - huge files, time to convert, but well worth it.
2. If memory is an issue and you can't do RAW, I've been shooting at 6MP not 12MP which seems to improve things (I won't go into technicalities, my brain hurts just thinking about it, but Fuji's website has a good article about how they 'magic' 12MP out of 6MP - although obviously not impartial.
3. Lighting has to be v good. True for any photo I guess but I'm sure superior cameras would deal with it better, if you make the S7000 work too hard for the exposure you get a lot of noise in the shadows and a horrible 'heat haze' along the edges.

Initially when I started discovering these noise issues I was quite annoyed, as otherwise I love the camera. But the way I look at it now, it's a good education, it makes you work a bit harder for the picture and think a bit more before pressing the shutter.

Standards appear to be very high here so when you do start getting pictures approved it's so much more worth it.

Just one other thing, about filtering noise. I recently downloaded Noiseware from a forum link, it's fairly good, but not the sort of thing, as a rule I like to do to my images. It has helped me get a couple of images on here though. The 'heat haze' I mentioned before tends to stay though no matter how much you filter it. I use it as a last resort.

Anyway that's my thoughts, hope this helps in some way. I'm sure some of the more experienced forum regulars will have some better advice.

(Edited on 2005-02-21 05:44:16 by Justified)
sakaasa
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Posted Tue Feb 22, 2005 1:10AM
There are a few threads about using the S7000 over in the Digital Camera forum here on iStock. A search for "S7000" should bring them up.

If possible, use a tripod and the 2-sec auto shutter release feature. And if using a tripod and shooting RAW, then you can take two photos instead of one. Use these as layers to make a single image in Photoshop, change the top layer to "multiply" blending mode, then adjust the levels. Doing this usually cancels out all noise.

When processing in Photoshop's RAW converter, increase the default for "reduce color noise" from 25% to 50%. Be sure that Photoshop's RAW converter options are set to "sharpen in preview only". If you do need to sharpen, do it last and use the USM in Photoshop.
Alfsky
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Posted Tue Feb 22, 2005 11:59AM
Again,thanx very much for your help.I'll try the suggestions.
Andy
digiphotoboy
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Posted Thu Feb 24, 2005 8:06AM
Can't you just duplicate the same image, creating another layer with the same image, then multiply/blend?




And if using a tripod and shooting RAW, then you can take two photos instead of one. Use these as layers to make a single image in Photoshop, change the top layer to "multiply" blending mode, then adjust the levels. Doing this usually cancels out all noise.





(Edited on 2005-02-24 08:12:57 by digiphotoboy)
sakaasa
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Posted Thu Feb 24, 2005 9:59AM

Can't you just duplicate the same image, creating another layer with the same image, then multiply/blend?


Yes, you can. The pixels are in the same locations if you use duplicate layers so it is not as effective as two separate images, but it works and I do that when I only have one image.
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