would like to learn vectors

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harryb007
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Posted Tue Aug 2, 2005 8:13PM
Hello, I am new here and seem to be drawn to the vectors and wonder if it is possible for a person to learn to design vectors on their own or is there schooling required. If it is possible how hard is it and what recommendations do the experts here have for me. Thanks in advance for all your help and suggestions.
fullvalue
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Posted Tue Aug 2, 2005 8:50PM
Well I'm not an expert but what I've learned I've self taught. I think schooling would make it easier and faster but I don't think it's necessary. I've spent a lot of time doodling to see what effects different things create. Get in there, roll up your sleeves and have some fun.
SharonRose
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Posted Tue Aug 2, 2005 8:57PM
I would like to know what "vector" means, and what "rasterize" means. I see the photos, but I don't know how they are made.
fullvalue
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Posted Tue Aug 2, 2005 9:36PM
Vector= geometry Vector art is created using math: lines, curves, etc. to form objects which are edited buy manipulating nodes. Nodes are specified points on the object which control whether it's a line or curve and the angle or arc of the segment. Vector art is scalable with no effect of the resolution. If you look at a picture in wireframe view in Illustrator or Coreldraw you can see the lines and curves.

Rasterize= taking vector art and converting it into a fixed resolution dependent size and format.

Raster/bitmap art= Art created through a series of dots or pixels. If you zoom all the way in on a Photoshop picture you'll see that all raster or bitmap pictures are created using little boxes of different colors. These are the pixels.

I hope this is what you were asking.
closed373788
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Posted Tue Aug 2, 2005 10:36PM
Get Adobe Illustrator and read everything at http://www.sketchpad.net and the Adobe Illustrator Classroom in a Book. If you truly want to learn vector art use a vector application, not Photoshop.

(Edited on 2005-08-02 22:36:59 by VectorScott)
Zuki
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Posted Wed Aug 3, 2005 1:04AM
I learned vector illustration completely on my own with no additional education, so yes, it is possible for you to learn on your own if you are committed and are willing to put out the effort necessary.

If you are going to get into vector art you need to start with a good program. I have worked with "Corel" and little bit of "Freehand" in the past but the best by far is "Adobe Illustrator." It is not cheap but then no quality art studio is, which is precisely what a good vector program will offer you.

One important note is this; a Good illustration program will not make you a good illustrator. If you have absolutely not illustration experience at all then here's where some education is imperative.

This principle is usually true, if you can sketch it out on paper then you can create it in a vector program. Most of my illustrations were worked out on paper first or they started out as doodles on a napkin or other bits of paper. The great thing about vector art is that it does not have to be complex but it does need to be clean and precise since it's application makes it vulnerable to scrutiny.

Having said all that I would encourage you to venture into it and give yourself some time to master the art.
sanguine
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Posted Wed Aug 3, 2005 1:03PM
I worked in an FE College for ten years and explaining vectors to teenagers was a perennial favourite. My approach was thus:

It's kind of like join the dots. You place the dots and decide whether the line between is straight or curved. You also set the thickness and colour of the line (stroke) and the fill colour. The computer does all the maths and draws the shape. You can go back at any time and move the dots, change the lines and change the colours.

Because the computer calculates the lines as you go along, you can zoom in as close as you like and the line remains smooth, unlike zooming in on a photograph where pretty soon you see individual pixels.

At a basic level, vector graphics are very clean and crisp, though with experience it is quite possible to produce complex tonal or distressed images. Producing the kind of soft, complex gradients that you see in a photograph is not really a strength of vector illustration.

To be diplayed on a screen or printed, the vector image has to rasterised, that is, it is converted to a pixel based image, like a digital photograph. A vector can also be exported as a rasterised image file, or converted on import to Photoshop for example.

As far as software is concerned, I have a lot of experience with Freehand and Illustrator. The latter is very much a standard, but I evaluated both from an educational standpoint at version 7 and again on each significant upgrade up to version 10. In my view, Freehand is easier, more direct and more flexible than Illustrator. Latterly I have been working as a freelance illustrator in the clothing industry. I would have missed many a deadline if I had been using Illustrator as my primary tool. Illustrator, however, does give more polish to a finished illustration.

I cannot speak for Corel Draw or any other package since I haven't used them.

My advice to anyone starting out is to get hold of the free trial versions of the sofware and use every second of the trial period. Don't install all at the same time, get to know each package as well as you can before you go on to the next. Buy whichever you prefer at the end.
velusariot
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Posted Sat Aug 6, 2005 9:30PM
Hey there - I've been creating vector art in Illustrator for several years, but I literally stumbled into it and learned everything on my own... Let's just say I exaggerated my skills on my resume - I was desperate to land a graphic design job after college and listed Illustrator as a program I had experience with... sooo not the case!

Well, I did land that job and immediately had projects requiring Illustrator - so I had to learn it on the fly, mainly by playing around in my free time and using the Help index to get things done quickly at work... I found a manual at the library and really got a lot out of it...

Moral of the story - don't fib on your resume, but DO take the time to play and create - it's not difficult to pick up if you really put forth the effort and just have fun with it
KimsCreativeHub
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Posted Sun Aug 7, 2005 7:01PM
velusariot, boy you've`e sure learned, great stuff!

I taught myself too
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