Light Meter - Does it help

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thinqkreations
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Sun Oct 31, 2010 2:47AM
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/Hi Friends,


I want to know whether Light Meter help us to get accurate picture. I mean if I know precise value of aperture and shutter i can get accurate picture. Do I?


I have seen some of photographer using Light meter in their shoot.


Can anybody guide me what should I do, as quiet often many of my pictures which are really nice have been rejected due to dull light etc....


Thank you in advance for reading my post and if able to help me.


Best Regards,
Jyoti
Whiteway
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Sun Oct 31, 2010 3:54AM
Even a properly-exposed photo may suffer from dull light / lack of contrast in the result. You need the right light, to begin with.

One thing that a light meter allows you to do is to stand next to the subject and aim your light meter back at the camera, which lets you measure incident light, and recommends an exposure value.

I have a light meter but I don't use it for this purpose, largely because my photos are 99% out-of-doors, and often close up. Still, if it suits your style of photography, you could give it a try.

However, your best course of action might be to show some of your rejections in the Critique forum, and see how people regard your 'failures'. You may get useful advice as a result. (If you're not used to the Critique forum, then read the 'sticky' thread at the top.)
Feverstockphoto
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Sun Oct 31, 2010 6:41AM

Yes take the rejections to critque forum and you will get loads of advice for images suitable for istocks standards. Also there is a lighting forum as well. Correct Exposrure is a little subjective  and you need to apply the lighting or restrict light according to atmosphere you want to create, concept, idea, message you wish to convey. Controll lighting to get the effect you want as a whole. Knowing shutter and aperture is like knowing ingredients to a cake, doesn't mean your cake wont turn out like a loaf of bread! . Everyone goes through the same here and even the best get rejections. But hopefully after learning and keeping up with what istock standards are and what they want rejections drop .


You can also scout rejections if you think the inspector was wrong. Best of luck.
TexPhoto
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Flash downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Sun Oct 31, 2010 7:06PM
Your camera has a light meter built in.  External meters serve a purpose (film & flash), but on a digital camera with unlimited shots and nice screen to view the histogram, i think you'd be wasting your time and money.  

And as the others have mentioned, good metering of bad light does not make for good photos.
thinqkreations
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Sun Oct 31, 2010 9:44PM
/
/Hi All,


Thank you so much for all your advice, now I am convinced buying light meter won't solve my problem but studying more about light will help me to understand my mistake and take correct shots.


I will definitely use critique form to post my rejected pictures and get idea what am i doing wrong and how to improve it.


Best Regards,
Jyoti
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