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PHOTO: Rejection on photomerge

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lostinbids
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Posted Mon Apr 18, 2011 2:33PM
Hi all, I was wondering how to merge isolated on white photos together.


This image was rejected for overfiltering


file_thumbview_approve


with the comment


+++Visible photomontage and blurring of models in background - (so I am guessing really bad smile)


Here's the link to the full sized one.  ETA this is a big file 10mb


To blur the background models I used the lens blur in PS, but I guess this was wrong. 


If anyone could give me advice on how to do this properly then that would be great.

(Edited on 2011-04-18 14:34:17 by lostinbids)
inhauscreative
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Posted Mon Apr 18, 2011 3:19PM
Shoot the model all together Boy did that sound like sjlocke or what. I think you've answered your own questions...I would suggest shooting 3 people and study the light fall off and shadows, this will help when compositing images.
lostinbids
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Posted Mon Apr 18, 2011 4:19PM
I guess the criteria has changed over the years.  Some of the photomontaged images in the collection are very obvious (one of two with the same person repeated etc). 


Dieter, I understand that shooting the models together is best but it is not always practical.  Are you saying that in this image I should apply shadow and highlights to make it seem like it is not a montage?

ETA Great SJLocke impression

(Edited on 2011-04-18 16:21:01 by lostinbids)
donald_gruener
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Posted Mon Apr 18, 2011 4:53PM
Well, you should always try to make it convincing. There are a number of factors here that are working against you. For me the biggest problem is that the lighting is different on each model. The second most apparent problem is the clipping around the frontmost doctor, particularly around his shoulders. Plus, where he overlaps the background models, his edges are soft as if he was shot with shallow depth of field, but his head/hair etc is all in focus and doesn't match the (apparent) focus on the rest of his body. The blurring on the rear models is not convincing. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it has an artificial, overprocessed look to it, rather than a natural bokeh effect. Since they appear to be close to him, less blurring or none at all may have worked better.

There are certainly some composites in the collection, accepted in the early years, that leave something to be desired. These days we're pretty tough on composites. A shot with three people like this is not hard to produce without compositing, so if you're going to fake it up, it's really got to stand with those which were done as a real shot.
sjlocke
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Posted Mon Apr 18, 2011 5:05PM
'Dieter, I understand that shooting the models together is best but it is not always practical. '

For this kind of easy shot, it is practical. You have to make it work. Otherwise it's a battle best left unfought for lighting and comping reasons mentioned. It's easy enough to get 3 people together that it should be well done.
esp_imaging
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Posted Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:15PM
As lit, the front person would have cast at least a little shadow on the people behind, especailly the younger woman on the left. If anything, he should appear a little brighter overall, and they should be a little darker, not the other way round.
lostinbids
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Posted Tue Apr 19, 2011 1:23PM

Donald, thanks for dropping by.  The physical lighting was the same for each but the processing was likely to be a bit different hence the difference in light (I know the lighting was the same, as I am lazy and didn't pack my lights away from one day to the next).  The clipping on the frontmost doctor is my fault.  I applied the blur to the edges.  I will try it again with out the lens blur on the background models.  If nothing else my computer will be really happy as a 44mp multi-layer image almost cooked it


Sean and Dieter, I guess I should step it up and get the models in at the same time. It would be easier to process.


Ed, thanks. It makes perfect sense as he would be 'closer' to the light source and would cast a shadow.
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