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Knee timber???

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gipi23
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Posted Thu Jul 19, 2012 2:44PM

I am struggling to find the very precise name for a particular type of tree growing in higher altitudes


I have only found knee-timber, which sounds about right, but there is nothing in the CV that comes close to that, and since it is a type of tree that is both relevant and typical for those altitudes, I am wondering if there is a term in English for it [certainly there is, but one that is available in CV], or would just timber do?


Thank you


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KLSbear
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Posted Thu Jul 19, 2012 10:05PM
I'm not sure of the specific type of tree but it looks to me that it's part of the Pine family, perhaps a Spruce of some sort.
Whiteway
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Posted Fri Jul 20, 2012 12:56AM
I think you have arrived at 'knee timber' via the German?

Krummholz or Krumholtz formation (German: krumm, "crooked, bent, twisted" and Holz, "wood") — also called Knieholz ("knee timber") — is a particular feature of subarctic and subalpine tree line landscapes. Continual exposure to fierce, freezing winds causes vegetation to become stunted and deformed.

You should be able to find out the exact species of this tree by referring to the place where you took the photograph. My knowledge of pines and spruces is not up to the task, I'm afraid. If you don't have any luck then tell us where the photo was taken.

By the way, your photo will probably sell more if you include information about where it was taken in your description.

(Edited on 2012-07-20 00:58:50 by Whiteway)
gipi23
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Posted Fri Jul 20, 2012 1:44AM

I never thought about the German, I used Slovak-English dictionary that provided knee-timber, and I did some googling and it proved correct , however the iStock CV does not recognise the term. After some searching I found out that pine tree has in its submenu 'dwarf mountain pine', so that is the one, it seems, as I've come across this term as well. However, what is the use of using the submenu item, if when I type it in the search box it is not 'resognised'?


High Tatras, Slovakia, though it might not draw any attention, but thanks for the advice, I've put the info in.
Whiteway
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Posted Fri Jul 20, 2012 3:17AM
This may help:

Almost two thirds of the park are covered with forests, mainly spruce and fir. The most widespread tree is the Norway Spruce, followed by the Scots Pine, Swiss Pine, European Larch, and Mountain Pine.

I am an ecologist, not particularly alpine, and I have never heard of the term 'knee timber' until today. Probably, krummholz is a term more used in ecology. A more conventional description for your photograph might be 'tree line', the point where trees give way to rocky landscapes. The CV does not have this term at the moment, so you would have to add it to your keyword list as a term, tree line. You should probably add krummholz, too, and not bother with 'knee timber'.
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