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underwood

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marcoventuriniautieri
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Posted Mon Jul 30, 2012 2:55PM

The CV only knows the Typewriter with this name, so excluding its real meaning:


http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/underwood


that is also very relevant for lots of nature and landscape photos here.
Whiteway
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Posted Tue Jul 31, 2012 2:01AM
I only know of 'Underwood' as a surname. In fact, Wikipedia says Underwood is a surname of English topographic origin. I suggest the original use that you describe is probably archaic, and that it is little used today.

In an ecological sense you might use understory (or understorey), which refers to the vegetation below the main trees in a forest. In a general way, you might describe this as low vegetation.

Depending on the image you are describing, scrub might also be suitable.
Difydave
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Posted Tue Jul 31, 2012 2:14AM

I'd agree Roger. Never heard it used or seen it written, apart from as a surname.


 
marcoventuriniautieri
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Posted Tue Jul 31, 2012 11:18AM

...however I see that not understory nor understorey are in the CV.


I think that at least one term to describe this type of vegetation should be in the CV.
Whiteway
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Posted Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:08PM
Show us your example, Marco.

PS: You can use understorey even if it is not in the CV. (I fancy there's an American and an English spelling here. Referring again to Wikipedia, we have A storey (British English) or story (American English) is any level part of a building that could be used by people (for living, work, storage, recreation, etc.. As an English ecologist, I choose storey.

(Edited on 2012-07-31 12:10:49 by Whiteway)
marcoventuriniautieri
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Posted Tue Jul 31, 2012 1:01PM
The reason I am insisting is that yesterday I sold an image.


As you know, when an image sells, the firstly listed keywords are related to the ones that the buyer used.


I was surprised: I had sold the image of a leafy typewriter - this is what I read in the keywords. Then I looked into the matter and I found out that I had simply inserted "underwood" in DeepMeta. Apparently, the inspectors themselves accepted the keyword, perhaps lacking a better one.


Apparently, the buyers themselves have, like me, used underwood in the botanical sense. This is the image, and I must say I have several that would benefit from such a keyword. 
file_thumbview_approve 

 

(Edited on 2012-07-31 13:01:56 by marcoventuriniautieri)
Whiteway
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Posted Tue Jul 31, 2012 3:01PM
Marco, you have no images that would benefit from the use of 'underwood', simply because this word is not used today in the sense that you mean. So, use 'underwood' only if you mean 'typewriter'. Otherwise, delete it.

Also, your image above does not show undergrowth or low vegetation. It shows dead leaves lying on the ground, under a tree. Once you have leaves, autumn, colour, tree trunk, square and one or two others, I'd say you're done on keywording this one.
Difydave
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Posted Wed Aug 1, 2012 3:52AM

I'd have said "undergrowth" was the common use word for this. A Google image search for "underwood" brings up people and typewriters. No undergrowth at all as far as I can see. That proves to me it's not in common use.


The order the keywords are listed in is (I believe) the viewing not the buying order. Most of the views here are going to be for background and leafy. Although really I'd associate "leafy" with leaves actually on trees.


 


 


 
ffranny
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Posted Thu Aug 16, 2012 9:24AM
BTW, "Underwood" referring to a typewriter is a brand name, and should be used with the same restrictions as other brand names and trademarked material.
OliverChilds
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Posted Wed Aug 22, 2012 8:55AM
 I agree tyhat underwood is a term that is no longer in use and would suggest "forest floor" as a relevant keyword.
Whiteway
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Posted Wed Aug 22, 2012 11:08AM
^Perhaps more like an orchard, Oliver.
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