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PHOTO: Application. Spider

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KBasham
Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 2:04PM
Hello, I'm working on my application shots and wondered if one of these spider shots from today would be useful to include. Thank you in advance for your feedback it's always very helpful.


Spider 1


Spider 2


Spider 3

(Edited on 2012-09-27 15:30:56 by donald_gruener)
sjlocke
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 2:22PM
They all look slightly blurry or OOF to me. How about the one after you crushed it under your shoe?
erniedecker
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:21PM
I would have to agree. I think too shallow depth of field and/or too slow shutter speed may be the problem, although I don't have exif info to be sure.
slobo
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 5:23PM
spider 2 may work. Others are not good.
esp_imaging
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 5:44PM
They are not sharp enough. They need to be critically sharp on an obvious point of interest on the subject like an eye, or mouthparts.
gladassfanny
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 5:55PM
The light is not particularly flattering either. It is rather flat and harsh.
KBasham
Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 6:44PM
*sigh* Okey dokey...Thanks guys, I'll try again.
Simplyphotos
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 8:17PM
Let me suggest that if you are taking something that may move or blow you try using the camera in the mode where you set your shutter speed, and go for 1/200 th of a second, and see if you have enough light to get a decent f number.  Your lens,t he 50 - 250 f4 is not a primo lens for this type of tiny subject but you defnitely can't work with shots that are 1/2 second and 1/8 second like the three you took here.  If you don't have enough light at 1/200th for the camerea not to flash the f4 at you then you need to get light on it or use a faster lens (goes to a lower f number, wider aperature and lets more light in).  That is as simple as I can make a quick not on it, but if the subject can move, start with setting a shutter speed that will have a chance of stopping the movement, faster shutter speed better, I would really be aiming for enough light to shoot a spider at 1/500.  At 1/2 second you are way too slow to hand hold any shot, and on a tripod of a moving subject you are unlikely to get it sharp enough.
DusanBartolovic
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Posted Thu Sep 27, 2012 10:50PM

Agree with everything that guys  above  said  ^   .  just wanted to add that looks like on all pictures focus is located on the left side near the object, closer to the lens *slightly missed* 


 


++ Its a very interesting spider, we have them a lot in my region, i say why not make it more interesting and diferent from other spider shots ? play with him , make something new, interesting for the eye and viewer. 
KBasham
Posted Fri Sep 28, 2012 5:10AM
Good advice, Thank you.
Difydave
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Posted Fri Sep 28, 2012 5:35AM

Macro of living subjects is particularly tricky. Even with a proper macro lens and lighting it's easy to miss the focus point, and it usually takes more than one shot to get right (or should I say it usually takes me more than one shot? )


Personally, unless you have the particular expertise and equipment for any specific type of photography like macro, I'd stick to more generalised type of subjects for an application.
KBasham
Posted Fri Sep 28, 2012 6:21AM

I hope it's ok to post another picture in the same thread instead of starting a new one...I was just wondering if I missed focus on this one as well. Thank you for taking a look.


Butterfly


 
esp_imaging
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Posted Fri Sep 28, 2012 6:56AM
Missed focus and a slightly odd viewpoint. Your photos
Posted By esp_imaging:

need to be critically sharp on an obvious point of interest on the subject like an eye, or mouthparts.
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