PHOTO: focus, strange isolation

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wepix
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Sat Dec 8, 2012 2:26AM
Hi,
this image (link) has been rejected (no resubmit) for the following two reasons:

1. We found this image to be out of focus viewed at 100%.
2. The execution of isolation contains stray areas that are either too feathered or rough.

->1. The image has a large in-focus-area on my graphics monitor. How is it on your monitor?
 ->2. Yes, there are many stray pixels around the edge when I push she black levels slider to the right. But this is a strange phenomenon. I use photoshop cs6. The tiff-file has a clean edge:

Image-tiff

I have converted the profoto profile to adobe rgb and changed the tiff to jpeg. My usual workflow. The jpeg in PS has a clean edge.

Image-jpeg-clean

However, when I reopen and check the saved jpeg, which should be perfect and ready for upload to IS, it has stray pixels. 

image-jpeg-stray-pixel

This appears to be a problem in PS.

What about the edge itself? Is it O.K. for IS standards? What is the best value for feathering in PS? I use 0.5 to 1.2.

Thanks for your critique.


 

(Edited on 2012-12-08 02:36:15 by wepix)
ThomasVogel
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Posted Sat Dec 8, 2012 3:34AM
your image is a bit soft. There are clearly visible aliasing edges around your isolation. You should use 0,5-0,7px softness for the edges when doing this. The problem is in your workflow, not in PS.

(Edited on 2012-12-08 03:36:16 by ThomasVogel)
wepix
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Posted Sat Dec 8, 2012 5:40AM

Thanks Thomas.
I had rather a workflow problem than a photoshop problem, because this could be solved easier.
But how come the jpg-file ist fine after converting it from tif to jpg and it has those stray pixels  after reopen it in PS?
I tried another image with 0.5 softness and have the same problem.


 
CHBD
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Posted Sat Dec 8, 2012 6:24AM

IMHO I think that the overall image focus doesn't match the appearance of the edge, at full size it is odd combination.
slobo
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Posted Sat Dec 8, 2012 11:18AM

I typically isolate with 1px when sharp and 2-5px when edge is not sharp.


Your image looks like as if you used scissors with somewhat jagged edges, cut a leaf and placed it on a white paper.


Sharpness is borderline, which means that some other inspector would not be bothered with it.


Stray pixels are 'normal' JPG artifacts and they don't count against your isolation. It helps if images has isolation path included.
wepix
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Mon Dec 10, 2012 6:12AM

@CHBD Thanks for pointing out. That‘s another level of isolation I hav to get into.


@Slobo Thanks! Great advice, that‘s what I was looking for. Good to hear the artifacts are "normal" photoshop performance.
esp_imaging
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Posted Mon Dec 10, 2012 6:45AM
Posted By wepix:


@Slobo Thanks! Great advice, that‘s what I was looking for. Good to hear the artifacts are "normal" photoshop performance.

It's not photoshop in particular, just the process of saving as a jpeg is likely to create a tiny bit of detectable artifacting at very sharply defined edges.
TheRealDarlaCLOSED
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Posted Mon Dec 10, 2012 7:57AM
Check your default settings for jpg compression or quality.
donald_gruener
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Posted Mon Dec 10, 2012 8:17PM
1. Don't worry about the faint JPEG artifacting you can detect on an isolated image. That's impossible to eliminate completely and the Inspectors do not run this kind of levels test on images - the inspection is based solely on bare-eyes analysis of the image at 100%.

2. The isolation here is way too hard-edged and is visibly jagged in places.

3. The image really should have also been rejected for the camera shake blurring visible in the image. That probably played a role in the No Resubmit. The Inspector should have clicked that reason as well.
wepix
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:05AM

Thanks for responding.


@donald_gruener: How can I recognize the camera shake in this picture? You must have eagle eyes Camera speed was 1/250 and the leaf was flying.
donald_gruener
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Posted Tue Dec 11, 2012 2:01PM
It has a subtle blur to it but that is not missed focus. In places you can perceive a "streaming" effect, even if it is slight. For a shot like this that resembles a studio still life, the eye expects the object to appear at rest. This exact leaf photo, in its original context (falling from the tree) would be perfectly acceptable focus, even with more blurring than that, because it would make sense in that context.

Oh, and, yeah, I've been a photo Inspector here for nearly 10 years. Eagle eyes I do indeed have.
wepix
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:41AM

@donald_gruener: 
I can‘t really see a "streaming" effect. But to know it is there, to pay attention to it, will help to train my eyes.
It would be great to have an in depth video-traing for inspecting an image. That would save inspectors and contributors a lot of time.


Thanks.
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