PHOTO lighting

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shishic
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Tue Jan 1, 2013 6:16AM

This is photo


https://www.dropbox.com/s/j25bhg41bavv75u/bedroom.jpg


and rejection reasons are 


-Flat/dull colors


-Direct on-camera flash and/or flash fall-off (bright subject, dark background)


-Harsh lighting with blown-out highlights that lack details and/or distracting shadows
- Distracting lens flares
-Incorrect white balance


I really don't see anything of that, so can somebody tell me what's wrong


Thanks
Feverstockphoto
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Tue Jan 1, 2013 6:56AM

Very harsh lighting in image, it can be seen in harsh transition between light and shodow areas, it'all over the place, look at shadow under bed and other objects, they should have smoother gradiations transition from light to dark (not noticable). There are blown out parts on wall near top left of curtain, it looks very strange, hot spots caused by direct lighting.... Other than that walls are badly skewed especially right vertical and flowers on right not looking great, book on bed does little....


I would reshoot. Maybe with less more moody lighting, beautiful woman and a box of chocolates .


Use lights with diffusers soften the lighting. There will be better experts in this interior lighting that hopefully give some advice.
donald_gruener
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Posted Tue Jan 1, 2013 11:43AM
Agreed - while the light is not terrible, it is hard light, creating distracting, sharp shadows. There are many many very nicely executed home interior shots in the collection - this one just doesn't quite reach our standard.

Did you use ambient light or did you shoot with lighting gear? If so, any modifiers on the lights? Even just simple umbrellas should get you a nicer, softer quality of light than this. When there's not room for umbrellas, another strategy can be to turn your lights towards the walls behind you so the light bounces into the room, this will soften it considerably.
shishic
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Tue Jan 1, 2013 12:39PM
I understand, thank you very much
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