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PHOTO: Starting Round 3 Application

Displaying 1 to 9 of 9 matches.
mbterry
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:12AM
I'm fairly new to photography (a few weeks) so I'm very open to critique. My first round of images, not linked here, were rejected because they were all too similar. They were all vehicle images...Understood.


"At this time we regret to inform you that we did not feel the overall composition of your photography or subject matter is at the minimum level of standard for iStockphoto. Please take some time to review training materials, resources and articles provided through iStockphoto. The photographs provided in your application should be diverse in subject matter, technical ability and should be your best work. Think conceptual, creative and most important think Stock photography. Try to avoid the average eye level push the button perspective of a common subject. Try and impress us, we want to see how you stand out from the crowd."


With my second go-around, I spent some time searching various queries on iStock looking for images they may not exist or very few exist. However, I received the same rejection statement.


"At this time we regret to inform you that we did not feel the overall composition of your photography or subject matter is at the minimum level of standard for iStockphoto. Please take some time to review training materials, resources and articles provided through iStockphoto. The photographs provided in your application should be diverse in subject matter, technical ability and should be your best work. Think conceptual, creative and most important think Stock photography. Try to avoid the average eye level push the button perspective of a common subject. Try and impress us, we want to see how you stand out from the crowd."


They were all very generic items and all of different subjects and different perspectives. Curious to see what your thoughts are as to why these might have been rejected. It might not be worthy for the application process but a submission afterwards?


http://www.wrenchbox.com/app_sample_view.jpg


http://www.wrenchbox.com/app_sample_view-1.jpg


http://www.wrenchbox.com/app_sample_view-2.jpg


Thanks for your help!

(Edited on 2013-01-29 10:13:41 by mbterry)

(Edited on 2013-01-29 10:16:20 by kelvinjay)
Difydave
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Flash downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusive
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:44AM

Sorry but there's nothing here I would use for an application.


Salt pepper mills, too much white background. Isolation needs work above and to the right and something showing on bottom edge. Big blown highlight areas with fairly unattractive reflections.


Dovecote. Rather scruffy subject taken in harsh sunlight with sharp shadows.


Dog biscuits. harsh lighting with dark shadows.


Nothing looks particularly sharp to me in any of the shots.


Also you need more variation in type of photograph. An object or still life. A portrait of a person, preferably doing something, and a landscape for instance. As I understand it, these days reviewers are looking for you to have some idea of what makes a stock photograph. The shots need preferably to convey a concept of idea.


To be blunt, having only been a photographer for a few weeks, your best course would be to read some books about the technical and artistic aspects of photography, and / or do a course. Take lots of photographs, and learn to process them for maximum impact before re-applying.


At present I think you are some way off getting accepted here.


 
sjlocke
Member is a Black Diamond contributor and has more than 200,000 Photo downloadsMember is a Gold contributor and has 5,000 - 12,499 Video downloadsMember is a Bronze contributor and has 125 - 1,249 Audio downloadsMember is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Flash downloadsMember is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto IllustratorExclusive iStockphoto Flash ArtistExclusive iStockphoto VideographerMember has had a File Of The Week
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:50AM

Posted By mbterry:
I'm fairly new to photography (a few weeks)


This says to me "I don't really need to be applying here yet". Really, take some time, learn your camera, read the manual, etc.
mbterry
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:45AM
Thanks for the replies. It's appreciated. I figured the comments would be rather "to the point." Not knowing any other photographers myself, I've found it hard to get critiques and therefore having to go off of what I'm reading, watching, seeing to figure out what's working/not working.
kbwills
Member is a Silver contributor and has 2,500 - 9,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:37PM

On a positive note - I could advise -


1. Use a tripod...


2. Join a camera club (although they will focus more on art rather than stock).


3. Take pics in manual mode until you are happy that you can do better than auto mode


4. Try just one image back here in the forum, and you will get more in-depth critiques to check out


I hope this doesnt come across as patronising - it is certainly not meant to.


Good Luck


 
donald_gruener
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Flash downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveMember has had a submission accepted to the Designer SpotlightMember has had a File Of The WeekForum Moderator
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 1:59PM

Posted By kbwills:

On a positive note - I could advise -


1. Use a tripod...


2. Join a camera club (although they will focus more on art rather than stock).


3. Take pics in manual mode until you are happy that you can do better than auto mode


4. Try just one image back here in the forum, and you will get more in-depth critiques to check out


I hope this doesnt come across as patronising - it is certainly not meant to.


Good Luck


 


^ That's good advice. I'd add:

-spend time looking at commercially-used photos in ads, brochures, etc. to gain a better feel for the type & style of imagery that designers are actually buying

-think a bit more deliberately about composition & perspective (salt & pepper look pretty random; surfaces of birdhouse are almost all in shadow; dog biscuits shot is stronger)

-inspect your photos for flaws at 100% - this is what we do so it's critical you do the same
donald_gruener
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Flash downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveMember has had a submission accepted to the Designer SpotlightMember has had a File Of The WeekForum Moderator
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:00PM

Posted By mbterry:
It might not be worthy for the application process but a submission afterwards?




And, no, sorry, none of these would pass inspection as submissions to the collection.
slobo
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Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:04PM

Your Nikon can do the trick. Kit lens (18-55) won't. Buy yourself 50/1.8 lens because it is cheap, sharp and fast. Use that lens to shoot stock. Learn how to control camera in manual mode. Try and use only lowest ISO settings; ISO 100 and ISO 200. Use tripod whenever possible, otherwise use faster shutter speed (1/125 and faster). Capture images in RAW format and learn how to process those. Avoid using built in flash but if you do, use sparingly as a fill light.


Search iStock for any topic of your interest and try to mimic images you see. Do not make exact copies for iStock use because inspectors will notice.
mbterry
Posted Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:45PM

Thanks everyone! I will note that I do shoot in Manual. I figured the only way to learn is to understand the camera front to back. I don't use the camera flash either. I've built my own makeship lighttent to practice before investing the money into a commercial tent. I will admit, I couldn't afford a tripod at the time of purchase but will be getting one very soon. Books are working well as a platform for the most part. Looking into other lenses. Just have figured out what I might be interested in most before investing the money.


Thanks!
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