How much to charge for Annual Report Template?

Displaying 1 to 9 of 9 matches.
hpoore
Posted Mon Apr 29, 2013 12:52PM

Hi there - I'm hoping that someone might be able to give me a little insight as to how to price a project. I'm being asked to design a template for an annual report (approx. 20 pages), and once the template is approved, they want me to lay it out. I'm a contract designer but mainly work as a Senior Designer for a marketing agency. This project is for a separate client. I have 7 years experience, and I live in the San Francisco Bay Area (high cost of living).


Does anyone have any advice on how I should price this out? I always feel like I underprice myself, but I don't want to overcorrect that and overprice myself ... ugh. 


Any advice would be much appreciated!


Hannah
mtngigi
Posted Mon Apr 29, 2013 4:57PM
Hannah,

There are a lot of questions you need to ask the client before submitting a bid. Annual reports can require bar charts and graphs, and those can be a lot of work. Are you designing the covers? Are you going to be responsible for working on photos? These are the kinds of things I want to know beforehand.

None of us can really tell you how to do this. There are too many variables. You need to estimate your time, add another few days to that, and come up with a figure you're happy with. Bidding is never easy, but you don't want to short-sell yourself. 

The most important thing to do is make sure you use a contract and spell everything out (especially if they are a new client). More than likely they want a flat rate cost, which is fine. But you have to make sure you put restrictions on the number of revisions, time-lines, who is responsible for what (i.e. proofing and editing), things like that. Set up specific goals and dates and a payment schedule. That way you protect yourself if things start getting out of hand (which we all know happens - a lot).

Things like this should be in writing:

"Any work over and above the agreed-upon number of revisions will be charged at my hourly rate of, etc. etc." And "Client is responsible for handing off copy and photos by" ... well, hopefully you get the picture.

For example, they have a deadline for this piece. You need to back up from that date to allow for your time, the proofing and revision time, and the time the printer needs to print it. In order for you to meet your deadlines (and ultimately theirs), they have to meet yours. Handing off copy and images on time for you to do your thing. All those dates, milestones/timelines should be included in a contract.

This is stuff that's really important to get in writing before you start anything. Head on over to AIGA's website - they have a wealth of information about the business of design.

I know I didn't answer your question, because it's not possible ... only you can determine what you'll be happy with making ... but I hope this has helped a little bit. And by the way, if a client balks at signing a simple contract - run away as fast as you can. That's a big red flag.

(Edited on 2013-04-29 16:58:28 by mtngigi)
Whiteway
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Tue Apr 30, 2013 1:14AM
Fully agree on the questions...

Use the answers to your questions to decide how many days you think it will take, and use a sensible charge per deum as the basis for your estimate.

It looks as if you are going to complete this job yourself. In other words, you are not asked to produce a template that the client themselves will use (lucky you). So you could estimate for the 'template' as part one of the job, and estimate producing the final document as a separate job. This gives you a way to get familiar with the work without estimating for the whole thing.

Regarding signing a contract, I use a different method. My correspondence is 90% via e-mail, which means that agreements and discussions are on the record. It is certainly important to list for the client those things that you expect to receive, and those things that you yourself will supply.

Most of all, you need to be sure of the final purpose of your work. It looks as if this is a design for you alone to work with. If the client has any expectations of using the design for themselves, in any practical way, that could throw up a whole set of different requirements.
mtngigi
Posted Mon May 27, 2013 2:21PM
Posted By Whiteway:
Fully agree on the questions...

Use the answers to your questions to decide how many days you think it will take, and use a sensible charge per deum as the basis for your estimate.

It looks as if you are going to complete this job yourself. In other words, you are not asked to produce a template that the client themselves will use (lucky you). So you could estimate for the 'template' as part one of the job, and estimate producing the final document as a separate job. This gives you a way to get familiar with the work without estimating for the whole thing.

Regarding signing a contract, I use a different method. My correspondence is 90% via e-mail, which means that agreements and discussions are on the record. It is certainly important to list for the client those things that you expect to receive, and those things that you yourself will supply.

Most of all, you need to be sure of the final purpose of your work. It looks as if this is a design for you alone to work with. If the client has any expectations of using the design for themselves, in any practical way, that could throw up a whole set of different requirements.

I'll bet you remember the days when folks used to come back and at least say thanks.
Whiteway
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Tue May 28, 2013 12:11AM
Ha! Nah.
mtngigi
Posted Wed May 29, 2013 7:48AM
I do.
Whiteway
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Wed May 29, 2013 8:53AM
I do too. You will have to pardon my little pun on the name of the OP.
mtngigi
Posted Thu Jun 6, 2013 8:40AM
Posted By Whiteway:
I do too. You will have to pardon my little pun on the name of the OP.


Oh ... I just got it. Good one.


For some reason, once again ... the subscription feed isn't working so I didn't know you had responded.
Whiteway
Member is a Gold contributor and has 10,000 - 24,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Videographer
Posted Thu Jun 27, 2013 12:38AM
^ I seem to remember you had to 'Unsubscribe' in order to subscribe, at one time. Don't know if it's still the case... Probably not, since I see there's a 'Subscribe' option at the top of the page.
This thread has been locked.
Displaying 1 to 9 of 9 matches.
Not a member?Join