PHOTO: Star Rock Chip

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jerbarber
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsExclusive
Posted Wed May 22, 2013 4:58PM

STAR ROCK CHIP


Was denied for following reasons:


 


We found the overall composition of this file's lighting could be improved. Some of the technical aspects that can all limit the usefulness of a file are:

-Flat/dull colors
-Direct on-camera flash and/or flash fall-off (bright subject, dark background)
-Harsh lighting with blown-out highlights that lack details and/or distracting shadows
- Distracting lens flares
-Incorrect white balance


 


I fix rock chips for a living and know that this particular image would be very sought after in the industry.  Please help me know why this may have been denied.
donald_gruener
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Flash downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveMember has had a submission accepted to the Designer SpotlightMember has had a File Of The WeekForum Moderator
Posted Wed May 22, 2013 5:27PM
I agree this is a potentially useful subject. The lighting is not terrible here, a few bits that are blown out. But the subject is not sharp at all: the focus is missed and there is camera shake blur. In fact the Inspector may have intended to hit the Out Of Focus rejection and hit Poor Lighting by mistake.

Next time you take a crack at this subject, I would suggest:

-Controlling the light a little better. I realize you're probably limited to using natural light with this subject, but there are still steps you can take, including carefully choosing your time of day, experiment with shooting on slightly overcast days, try using some light diffusion material in direct sun, etc.

-Making sure you get it sharp. First of all, to avoid camera shake, be sure you've got an adequate shutter speed selected (assuming you can't get a tripod to work, which is understandable here). Extreme close up work magnifies shake, so you need more shutter speed than with handheld shots of more distant subjects. It makes more sense to dial up ISO a bit if necessary in order to get a sharp shot - a little more noise is going to be preferable to a blurred shot that will get rejected. To nail the focus, you may be better off switching to manual focus and moving the whole camera in order to bring the subject into focus. Take several frames with slight movements closer and further so you've got some options to comb through.

Good luck!
slobo
Member is a Diamond contributor and has 25,000 - 199,999 Photo downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Video downloadsMember is a Bronze contributor and has 125 - 1,249 Audio downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Flash downloadsMember is a contributor and has less than 250 Illustration downloadsExclusiveExclusive iStockphoto Audio Artist
Posted Fri May 24, 2013 9:38AM
Image should have been rejected for artifacts due to over sharpening. See how glass looks textured where it should be smooth.
stockwerk
Member is a Bronze contributor and has 250 - 2,499 Photo downloadsExclusive
Posted Fri May 24, 2013 1:13PM
Also the focal plane and the plane of the glass the chip is in seem not to have been parallel.
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