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Outline technique

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FreeTransform
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Posted Tue Nov 14, 2006 10:17AM

Posted By ChrisGorgio:
also where do I find the "fidelity and
smoothness" settings for the "brush tool"


Double-click on the Brush tool to bring up the settings.

Also check your tablet settings--I believe you can adjust the sensitivity of it in the Tablet control panel (under System Preferences on a Mac).
ChrisGorgio
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Posted Wed Nov 15, 2006 1:30AM

Thanks very much, I'm almost too embarrassed to say what I was doing wrong...I was using the pencil tool instead of the paintbrush...In
my own defence in the past I have drawn the strokes then applied art
brushes, as I didn't have a tablet to make best use of the calligraphic
brushes.


You're right there is no defence really, sorry 
diane555
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Posted Wed Nov 15, 2006 10:51AM
Hey Tony. Thanks for the quick tute. One question though. Your inked toon doesn't have any excess nodes...are your settings that acurate or did you remove the unnecessary ones? I have used that Nat showed us once in a while. I'd like to try one that was hand inked. Maybe I will...
dryp
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Posted Sat Nov 18, 2006 8:35AM
Zuki, you are perfectly right! ;-)
 Posted By Zuki:

The secret in the elephant drawing is not so much in the brush but
in the pressure and release, cartoonists have been using this method
ever since Bambi.  Also, the artist sometimes incorporates a
deliberate jiggle to create that rough look in the line.


This
is best achieved with a traditional brush or with a pressure sensitive
ink pen on paper and then scanned and outlined in a vector program.


As an example I copied part of dryp's drawing using a regular ink pen on plain paper.


eleph
Zuki
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Posted Sat Nov 18, 2006 2:59PM

dryp,


As a traditional cartoonist, I think your illustrations rock!!
dee-jay
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Posted Sat Nov 18, 2006 5:33PM

Thanks everyone for all the great info! I'm sure I'll need a lot of practice to do anything that even comes close to what I've seen but that's ok, it'll keep me off the streets.


And thanks to you too dryp, I hope you don't mind me showing off your image!
BrianHauge
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Posted Sat Nov 18, 2006 7:09PM

This might sound goofy to some of the more experienced illustrators, but Flash has some nice illustrating tools that come in very handy for creating inky lines without excess nodes.  I like to sketch IN Flash with a tablet.  (There's also the ability to export EPS so nobody ever knows you used Flash to build it.  Unless you blatantly reveal your secrets in an online forum, that is.)


  squatchy


myspacegraphic
Zuki
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Posted Sat Nov 18, 2006 11:24PM

Fenstalker,


By all means necessary.
dryp
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Posted Sun Nov 19, 2006 8:25AM

Posted By Zuki:
dryp,
As a traditional cartoonist, I think your illustrations rock!!

Thanks a lot! You have a great portfolio yourself

Posted By dee-jay:
And thanks to you too dryp, I hope you don't mind me showing off your image!

Of course not. You're welcome!

Dan

(Edited on 2006-11-19 08:26:46 by dryp)
ProfessorVector
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Posted Sun Nov 19, 2006 1:00PM

@D555,


If by nodes, you mean vector points, well yeah, there are gonna be quite a few of those when using any auto trace-like function, but so far, so good with the Live Trace preset.


all the best,
t


@ Zuki,
Nice portfolio.
NickyBlade
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Posted Sun Nov 19, 2006 3:53PM
Can anyone tell me, for those using the brush in illustrator... when I use the brush in illustrator, then expand, expand appearance, or flatten transparency... the paths in my shapes always overlap. Is there something I'm doing wrong? So far, the only way I've found around this other than by fixing each overlapping area by hand is to rasterize, then use live trace, which defeats the pupose of drawing in illustrator in the first place. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
FreeTransform
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Posted Sun Nov 19, 2006 4:26PM

Posted By NickyBlade:
when I use the brush in illustrator ... the paths in my shapes always overlap.

What you can do is select the expanded path and use the Pathfinder (Effect>Pathfinder>Add) to add the overlapping shapes. You can also bring up the Pathfinder palette (Window>Pathfinder) to use it.

Also remember that when you expand a custom brush stroke, Illustrator leaves behind a "spine" of the original stroke. It will have a fill & stroke of "none," so be sure to delete those, as they will show up as open paths.
NickyBlade
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Posted Sun Nov 19, 2006 6:24PM
Thank you!
Roofoo
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Posted Sat Jan 13, 2007 7:27AM
I can't believe I missed this great thread until now!  I'll give it a push up front.  Thanks to all for the great tips and examples.
Keekoo
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Posted Sat Jan 13, 2007 9:15AM

Nice thread

I *love* outlines so much that I have trouble making anything without them  
chuntise
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Posted Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:26AM
For me personally, nothing comes close to using an actual brush and ink on paper. That's how I've started doing all my outlines. I never have been able to get really good control over my line thickness using a tablet, and the plastic nub at the end of the tablet pen in no way has the physical feedback of a good brush. I've never found an acceptable digital substitute that can turn out the same kind of line quality you get from an actual brush and ink.

I start with a sketch in regular old graphite. Then I scan the sketch so I can cite it as my image source (and so I can print another in case I screw up the inking on the original ). Then I ink my original sketch with a good quality sable brush. Lately I've been using a #2 Winsor & Newton Series 7 Kolinsky Sable brush (about 10 bucks from dickblick.com), and it's the finest brush I've ever had the pleasure of working with.

If it's a particularly complex inking job (like some of my forthcoming "woodcut" illustrations) I'll just scan the inked lines and use livetrace. But if it's just a fairly simple outline, I'll scan it and manually trace over the lines with the pen tool.

istockphoto_2713405_
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