Exposing for RAW article on Digital Photo Pro

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sylvanworksCLOSED
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:31AM
Link

Thought this was worth sharing.
sylvanworksCLOSED
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:31AM
lagereek
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:46AM

Thanks for sharing!


Very interesting reading.

Chris 
YinYang
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 7:19AM
Thanks sylvanworks, that explained a few mysteries that has always puzzled me about the exposing to the right method! Namely what we see in the LCD on highlight clipping and histogram is not what we actually get! I have always suspected something like that but GO FIGURE!
Whiteway
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 2:39PM
Thanks, Rob.

I read the article. Now, how do I expose for RAW?
YinYang
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:09PM
Ahhh.... to the right.... except we don't really know where the right is, Do we!



Posted By Whiteway:
Thanks, Rob.

I read the article. Now, how do I expose for RAW?
sylvanworksCLOSED
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:26PM
Use the force!
Whiteway
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:38PM
The main thing I learned from the article was not to rely on the in-camera histogram. Being brought up on film, I never have.

I knew that there is more detail in the lighter areas of the photo, and once read someone here say they always elected to overexpose, deliberately. But - you don't want to lose the highlights.

So, overall, I think I'm where I started!
kelvinjay
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Posted Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:05PM
Interesting read, thanks for sharing
HKPNC
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Posted Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:57PM

 


If you don’t have time to read the whole article, here is the money line:


...Noise in shadows can be reduced in a number of ways, but if you blow out highlight data you wish to capture, there’s nothing that will bring that data back....


Isn’t that the truth?
CWLawrence
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Posted Wed Jan 30, 2008 5:18AM
^^^ and then there's this:

Note that the on-camera histogram shows the histogram of the in-camera conversion to JPEG...Most cameras apply a fairly strong S-curve to the raw data so that the JPEGs have a more film-like response, with the result that the on-camera histogram often tells you that your highlights are blown when, in fact, they aren’t.


wtf?
sakaasa
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Posted Wed Jan 30, 2008 5:33AM
Posted By CWLawrence:
^^^ and then there's this:



Note that the on-camera histogram shows the histogram of the in-camera conversion to JPEG...Most cameras apply a fairly strong S-curve to the raw data so that the JPEGs have a more film-like response, with the result that the on-camera histogram often tells you that your highlights are blown when, in fact, they aren’t.


wtf?
It is true that the histogram or the "show highlights" in many camera LCD screens can show blownout highlights when they are not. Processing the RAW image can recover or retain data in these areas. The histogram is of the jpeg contained in the RAW file. If I get a little spike on the right in one color channel, I know that the highlight still contains enough data that it will not be blown out. (D200)

(Edited on 2008-01-30 05:34:01 by sakaasa)
YinYang
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Posted Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:04AM
I too have notice that as well with Canon, I can blow the HL in the histogram a little, and when the raw file comes into conversion, the slight blown highlight often disappeared, but the nice thing is that the shadow now have move to the right, giving me much less noise in the shadow.


Posted By sakaasa:
Posted By CWLawrence:
^^^ and then there's this:



Note that the on-camera histogram shows the histogram of the in-camera conversion to JPEG...Most cameras apply a fairly strong S-curve to the raw data so that the JPEGs have a more film-like response, with the result that the on-camera histogram often tells you that your highlights are blown when, in fact, they aren’t.


wtf?
It is true that the histogram or the "show highlights" in many camera LCD screens can show blownout highlights when they are not. Processing the RAW image can recover or retain data in these areas. The histogram is of the jpeg contained in the RAW file. If I get a little spike on the right in one color channel, I know that the highlight still contains enough data that it will not be blown out. (D200)

(Edited on 2008-01-30 05:34:01 by sakaasa)
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