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DIY Camera Stabilizer Cheap

Displaying 1 to 16 of 16 matches.
sylvanworksCLOSED
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Posted Mon Apr 21, 2008 9:25AM
Kativ
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Posted Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:02AM

That sounds like a simple solution and although I haven't tried it, I think it's going to work.


Thanks for the post!
arsenik
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Posted Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:40AM
That's really interesting... thanks for the link.
ho72CLOSED
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Posted Tue Apr 22, 2008 7:24AM
All I get is the text, no photo or video (probably blocked here at work... and my home computer is in storage). Can someone post another link or an explanation please?
KarenMower
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Posted Tue Apr 22, 2008 4:54PM

Buy a bolt that has the same thread type as the tripod mount on the bottom of your camera.  Some string that does not stretch.  A washer or something large enough to step on. 


Tie the string to the bolt.  String Length needs to be the height from the bottom of your camera to the ground when you are standing to take a shot.    Tie the string to the washer.  Connect the bolt to the bottom of your camera.  Step on the washer.  As you shoot keep tension in the string.


I have not tried the technique, It looks like it could work pretty well.


I hope this description helps you ho72.


 
wsmahar
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Posted Tue Apr 22, 2008 5:21PM
I've heard it called a "Stringpod"
TexPhoto
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Posted Tue Apr 22, 2008 7:12PM
It's OK, but...with monopods running $18 at Walmart this seems silly. And a monopod, even if not extended to the ground will do far more than a piece of string.

Please, if you have not tried a monopod, please do. It works better and is less silly looking.
h0rde
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Posted Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:36PM
Posted By TexPhoto:
It's OK, but...with monopods running $18 at Walmart this seems silly. And a monopod, even if not extended to the ground will do far more than a piece of string.

Please, if you have not tried a monopod, please do. It works better and is less silly looking.

But it's a lot less portable than something you can roll up and stick in your pants pocket.
TexPhoto
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Posted Wed Apr 23, 2008 12:37PM

Agreed, but a DSLR is a lot less portable than a point and shoot.  Having a Pro f2.8 lens is alot less portable than a cheap  kit lens, and on and on.  The stringpod has been around for decades, nobody uses it becuase the benift is out wieghted by the detriment.

In the video the guy pans right... then left, then right...  Very dramatic, but he never walks a step.  Why? because he'd trip over the silly thing and maybe rip the camera out of his hand.  And, it increases the load in your hands as you pull up.  So your camera is heavier, you wear out faster, and you shake the camera because you are tired.  A monopod relieves the weight if you extend it, and it's a whole lot easer to move with, extended or not.

I'll bet the guy in the video does not use one regularly,  nor does one photographer here. 
joshlaverty
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Posted Wed Apr 23, 2008 5:31PM
A little disappointing with all the ellaborate emphasis on knots and sealing the tips of the string to have an old stringpod illustrated. Ha, well they work, but so does using the sling of your camera over your shoulder and pushing outwards. The shake then comes from your tired muscles. I agree, monopods are cheap and do a better job, but I suppose in a bind, this could be useful, but I am far more likely to use the sling first.
slobo
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Posted Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:48PM

Very interesting idea. Thanks for the post.

 
impactimage
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Posted Thu Apr 24, 2008 6:17PM

The best image stabilization system I've seen yet was one a guy I met in Arkansas when I was a flight instructor.  He hired me to fly him around so he could take photographs from one of the school's airplanes.


He had somehow acquired a military-issue gyroscope, and built a mounting system to attach it to his camera.  Back in those days, I knew nothing about photography...but I remember being quite impressed when he handed me the camera.  Fully spooled up, the gyroscope provided so much inertia you'd almost break your wrist trying to move the camera.  I can't imagine how many stops of stabilization that thing would provide.


Kind of heavy though.
karenhermannCLOSED
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Posted Sun Apr 27, 2008 11:35AM

A former husband once came up with something cool for me for a stabilizer.  He got a screw that was the same size and type as the tripod mount on the camera, welded it to the top of a locking vise-grip.  A little limited, but useful on a couple of occasions.  On the other hand, I had a much lighter camera -- I doubt if that would be practical or advisable for anything too heavy. 
TexPhoto
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Posted Sun Apr 27, 2008 10:08PM
Gyroscopes for cameras are commercially available, they just cost a ton of money: http://www.ken-lab.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=KL&Category_Code=GS

There are lots of solutions out there, but I don't think most have tried a monopod, or for that matter understand how to use one. I use mine all the time without extending it, and am occasionally stopped by photographers or others who tell me "your not using that right", or "it won't work that way." It works fine that way and adds maybe two stops of stability. It's not cumbersome for me, because I carry the camera that way. That is, I leave the camera on the monopod, and carry it in one hand, holding the monopod. When I shoot, I hold the camera normally. The monopod, if not touching ground, dangles and stabilizes the camera like a pendulum. Shooting vertical?, brace against a tree or wall if convenient, or nothing if not. My camera bag has no room for my camera because it just does not take good pictures from there. The bag carries lenses, flash, etc.

The monopod also lets me do some things none of the above devices do, and that is photograph with the camera held 4-5 feet away from me. (use a cable release or self timer) Great for dangerous animals, getting the camera over the waterfall to look straight down, etc. Oh, and you can ward off evil doers with one. I have twice been asked to hand over the camera by a potential mugger. Sure I said, just allow be to disconnect this big metal stick that I will then crush your skull with.

Of course, when you NEED a tripod, you need a tripod. Oh and I have found that if your shooting someplace that does not allow tripods, or requires an expensive permit to use them, you can usually get away with a monopod.
brians101
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Posted Fri Jun 20, 2008 12:08PM

The string and bolt idea is worth a try, but I think texphoto's monopod idea great. Have found not extended it tends to get in the way, perhaps I need some practice.


Brian
Tjanze
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Posted Sat Jun 21, 2008 1:35AM
I made this and try it a year ago.This is not good solution.Thing dont work good as seen on video.
As I say.I made this,try it and in next 5 minutes throw it in basket.
Cheapest monopod is 100% better than this rope.

I dont know if you see this technics from Joe McNally? (national geographic photographer)
I am right eye photographer and didnt have problems to switch on left eye.
I use this technics today in 90%. (for hand holding camera photography)

Try this technics:
Go on YouTube and write in search bar:
Joe McNally - Da Grip

(Edited on 2008-06-22 00:12:29 by Tjanze)
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