Which Monitoring Headphones?

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pdtnc
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 12:10AM
Beyer? AKG? Sennheiser?

I've made my own little tracks up for years monitoring thru my HiFi speakers, but its clear to me now that I need to be a little more precise before submitting audio that has been rounded off by the forgiving nature of my speakers. I need to listen closer for noise too than I can through my speakers, so a good set of Cans is probably my best option. *not to mention blasting random audio snippets at my fiancé all evening*

How about...
AKG K171s Studio Headphones?
Beyerdynamic DT100 Pro Headphones?
Sennheiser HD280 Pro Headphones?
something else?

The above is pretty much my price range for a sensible spend.
cheers for any advice.
JamersonG
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 1:36AM

If you want headphones for monitoring AFTER recording (i.e. editing, mixing etc.) then I'd recommend open back headphones as you tend to get a better frequency response.  Closed back are good if you need isolation from musicians (or if you have small children!).


I use Beyer DT990s and I'm very happy with them, but your best bet is to Google some independent reviews.  All the brands you mentioned are very good
pdtnc
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 2:16AM
I'd probably go for closed back, I'm in a room with a couple of computers whirring away!
What about these?
Audio Technica, any good?
JamersonG
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 3:26AM
Hmm, I would go for Beyer or Sennheiser personally.  That's not to say that other brands don't produce equipment that's just as good, but for the price tag you're after I'd be more comfortable going with something tried and tested worldwide.. like the DT100s.
SerenDigital
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 4:02AM

I've been in love with my Behringers for the last seven years.  Sounds silly, but they were one of the only companies that sold a pair that fitted my small head!  Don't buy a pair till you've tried them on.


 


I can't look what model they are, I've lent them to my better half while he's in and out of hospital!
FuzzMartin
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 5:42AM

There are three things you need to look for:


1. Open/Closed Ear (as mentioned above)
2. Dynamic Range. The smaller the first number (Hz) and the higher the second number (kHz), the better. 
3. Comfort/Personal taste


I use a pair of Sony MDR-CD780's (5Hz--30kHz) that I bought back in 1999 or 2000. They are better than any pair of Sennheisers or AKGs that I have ever tried on. They don't make that model anymore, but I do like the MDR-7509-HD.


All that being said, the Sennheiser 280's (8Hz-28kHz) that are noted above are on sale at Amazon for 54% off ($99 instead of $199).
pdtnc
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 6:48AM
I sent an email to a mate who has a pair of AKG K 240 STUDIO, he's happy with them and they were in my price range so I just ordered a pair (fingers crossed they fit my head eh!)

Cheers for the input guys, I'm sure this thread will prove useful to someone else too.
Geoarts
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 8:54AM

Yes, it did for me as I was looking for a good pair of headphones.  Thanks!
inhauscreative
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 9:10AM
I love my Sennheiser HD 280 Pro
toddmedia
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 12:28PM

It seems the question should be ... which headphones are the Inspectors using? I want those.


For that matter, I'd like to know all of their hardware. 


 


.
onfilm
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 4:47PM
IMO headphones are a compromise and I seriously hope the inspectors are listening on proper monitor speakers.
toddmedia
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 6:46PM
Posted By onfilm: 
IMO headphones are a compromise and I seriously hope the inspectors are listening on proper monitor speakers.


I assumed that would be the case but then one Inspector said his desk was next to another person's ... so then I'm thinking cubicles with headphones. LOL


So yes .... it would be nice to see some photos and gear list of what the iStock 'audio facilities' actually entail. (They might just be using a mp3 player to listen while cruising up and down the highway eating pies)


.
cdwheatley
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 6:54PM
Monitoring is generally done in proper room with proper studio monitors. Hearing acurate bass in headphones can be quite a challenge.
PJ Hudson
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 7:26PM
Posted By cdwheatley:
Monitoring is generally done in proper room with proper studio monitors. Hearing acurate bass in headphones can be quite a challenge.



exactly what I was going to say-  it's an entirely different representation on real studio monitors.


however, different types of cheapo headphones are useful for checking a final mix (or file if it's one shot) in the following scenarios, I've found:


Earbud phones (or earphones)  are great for hearing clicks, pops, and high frequency hiss/noises that you wouldn't hear otherwise.


Walkman style headphones are good for checking mid-range frequencies and getting a basic idea of tonal quality (especially while comparing with high quality commercial tracks with the same 'phones.)


Cheapo Earmuff headphones (studio style headphones) will let you know generally how muddy or thin your mix is.


only problem is that there are so many other factors that you can't accurately critique sounds with headphones without a proper studio monitor reference as well.
cdwheatley
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Posted Sun May 18, 2008 8:26PM
Posted By PJ Hudson:

Posted By cdwheatley:
Monitoring is generally done in proper room with proper studio monitors. Hearing acurate bass in headphones can be quite a challenge.




exactly what I was going to say- it's an entirely different representation on real studio monitors.


however, different types of cheapo headphones are useful for checking a final mix (or file if it's one shot) in the following scenarios, I've found:


Earbud phones (or earphones) are great for hearing clicks, pops, and high frequency hiss/noises that you wouldn't hear otherwise.


Walkman style headphones are good for checking mid-range frequencies and getting a basic idea of tonal quality (especially while comparing with high quality commercial tracks with the same 'phones.)


Cheapo Earmuff headphones (studio style headphones) will let you know generally how muddy or thin your mix is.


only problem is that there are so many other factors that you can't accurately critique sounds with headphones without a proper studio monitor reference as well.



Thats good advice.


The problem with the studio monitors for the people who haven't been to the music school of hard knocks is, The acoustics in your room(home studio) are going to have all kinds of issues. So your mixes will never sound the same in different rooms and players. Frequencies will cancel eachother out due to room nodes and standing waves(for example: put some music on and go to one of corners of your room and you will hear how the bass multiplies on itself). So the mix might sound great in your studio but then you take it in your car and bass rattles your speakers or there is nasty nasal sound on the high end. Monitoring in a bad room can drive you nuts. Recording in bad room can drive you nuts as well..LOL


There is a ton of information on the net about acoustics and setting up a room for recording. I highly recommend anyone that is serious about getting into music to soak up as much info as possible. Its easy to make costly mistakes on equipment, room treatments etc if you don't know what your doing..
JamersonG
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Posted Mon May 19, 2008 2:48AM
Posted By cdwheatley:  The problem with the studio monitors for the people who haven't been to the music school of hard knocks is, The acoustics in your room(home studio) are going to have all kinds of issues. So your mixes will never sound the same in different rooms and players. Frequencies will cancel eachother out due to room nodes and standing waves(for example: put some music on and go to one of corners of your room and you will hear how the bass multiplies on itself). So the mix might sound great in your studio but then you take it in your car and bass rattles your speakers or there is nasty nasal sound on the high end. Monitoring in a bad room can drive you nuts. Recording in bad room can drive you nuts as well..LOL


There is a ton of information on the net about acoustics and setting up a room for recording. I highly recommend anyone that is serious about getting into music to soak up as much info as possible. Its easy to make costly mistakes on equipment, room treatments etc if you don't know what your doing..



QFT.  I'd like to take this opportunity to recommend Sound On Sound magazine as a brilliant way to learn these things.  They also have a bunch of online articles which are available for free >> soundonsound.com


I can aso confirm that it's quite easy to produce successful tracks in an untreated space, using a combination of nearfield monitors (speakers) and headphones.  Not least because I've done it myself for years..  As mentioned, the bass is the tricky area but a combination of several listening devices, software frequency meters and plain ol' common sense should make an expensive studio treatment unnecessary


Having said that, you can probably halve the problems in any room with some strategically placed pieces of foam which are really quite cheap.  Again, read up on it.. SOS (above) is a GREAT resource.
Natural_Warp
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Posted Mon May 19, 2008 4:09AM
/
/why headphones indeed ?

maybe we ( all artists want the best equipment right ?? ) should talk about monitors

the fastest pc, duo-core/ quadcore processors , the best videocard , the newest software , ect ...

the biggest flatscreen monitor, the highest contrast, the fastest reactionspeed ...
the most expensive camera , the highest pixelamount 10.3 Megapixels , 12 MP ect , the fattest lens ...
now the best headphones ...

i'd say , no headphones , but nearfield monitors ( speakers ) like for example dynaudio acoustics
( i dont sell these so this is no publicity but i'm told they are the best and i use one pair myself )

i dont say they are cheap , but they give u the highest accuracy in sound i ever heard !!!
some other recommendations ??

(Edited on 2008-05-19 04:12:36 by Natural_Warp)
JRigo
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Posted Tue May 27, 2008 5:04AM
AKG K271S sounds great!!! This is my favorite.
thepugnatious
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Posted Tue May 27, 2008 3:53PM
Posted By JRigo:
AKG K271S sounds great!!! This is my favorite.

indeed, used from time to time at the HQ
fancymap
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Posted Tue May 27, 2008 3:59PM

If you are recording in the field you should always wear really good headphones.  Many people in film and video world have recommended Sony MDR-7506 as the industry standard for years.  There are many good Sony models out there for this purpose, and 7506 remains a good pair for accurate recording.


When judging a pair of headphones (or studio monitors!) you should see if you can find the frequency-response curve.  It's a diagram (line) over the entire frequency spectrum.  You want something with a FLAT line, or as flat as possible.  This means nothing is being artificially boosted or cut from the sound you are monitoring.  Accuracy is the key, always. 


Of course, training your ears to hear is also very important which comes with practice of recording and editing.
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