Aerial of Mount Ararat in Armenia - Stock Image

Vetta Stock Photo: 4894472
Small
849 x 565 px | 11.8 × 7.8" @ 72 dpi | 630.00 KB
$84.00 USD
45 credits
Medium
1698 x 1131 px | 5.7 × 3.8" @ 300 dpi | 1.95 MB
$125.00 USD
70 credits
Large
3504 x 2336 px | 11.7 × 7.8" @ 300 dpi | 6.87 MB
$133.00 USD
75 credits
Multi-Seat (unlimited)
$259.00 USD
150 credits
Unlimited Reproduction / Print Runs
$400.00 USD
250 credits
Items for Resale (limited run)
$400.00 USD
250 credits
Electronic Items for Resale (unlimited run)
$400.00 USD
250 credits
Extended Legal Guarantee covers up to $250,000
(included)
(included)
Standard license only

Download With Credits


You need iStock Credits to download this file You need 1 iStock Credit to download this file
iStock Credits are sold in a variety of convenient packs to fit projects big or small. The bigger credit pack you buy the more you save!
Buy Credits Already have credits? Sign In

You've got XX/XX downloads / remaining.

Having troubles with the download? Start downloading

You can return to re-download this image at any time before your subscription term ends.

You have 0 subscription downloads left

It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the but you've still got XX iStock credits in your account.

You have 0 subscription downloads left

It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the . You can still download this image with iStock credits.

Unable to download file

We're unable to process your download at this time. Please try again later. If the problem persists, contact us.

Description

Mount Ararat (see section Names for other names) is the tallest peak in Turkey. This snow-capped, dormant volcanic cone is located in the Igdir Province, near the northeast corner of Turkey, 16 km (10 mi) west of the Iranian and 32 km (20 mi) south of the Armenian border. This picture was taken while flying over Armenia. Ararat is a stratovolcano, formed of lava flows and pyroclastic ejecta, with no volcanic crater. Above the height of 4,200 m (13,780 ft), the mountain mostly consists of igneous rocks covered by an ice sheet. A smaller 3,896 m (12,782 ft) cone, Little Ararat, rises from the same base, southeast of the main peak. The lava plateau stretches out between the two pinnacles. The bases of these two mountains is approximately 1,000 km² (386 sq mi) wide. The formation of Ararat is hard to retrieve geologically, but the type of vulcanism and the position of the vulcano raise the idea that subduction relation vulcanism occurred when the Tethys Ocean closed during the Neogene, as recently occurred along the borders of the Eurasian, African and Arabian plates from Cabo de Gata to the Caucasus.
file_thumbview_approve file_thumbview_approve file_thumbview_approve file_thumbview_approve file_thumbview_approve file_thumbview_approve file_thumbview_approve
Not a member?Join
Cart (0)