Angkor Thom Deva, Cambodia - Stock Image

1 credit New - All file sizes are now the same price.

XX credits New - All file sizes are now the same price.

Signature Collection
  • S
  • M
  • L
Standard license only

You need XX iStock Credits to download this photo

You need 1 iStock Credit to download this photo

You've got XX/XX downloads / remaining.

Having troubles with the download? Start downloading

You can return to re-download this image at any time before your subscription term ends.

You have 0 subscription downloads left

It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the but you've still got XX iStock credits in your account.
It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the .
You can still download this image with iStock credits.

Unable to download file

We're unable to process your download at this time. Please try again later. If the problem persists, contact us.
Description
The south gate of Angkor Thom is the best preserved. It is approached from outside via a causeway that extends about fifty meters across a moat. On each side of the causeway are railings fashioned with 54 stone figures engaged in the performance of a famous Hindu story: the myth of the Churning of the Ocean. On the left side of the moat, 54 'devas' (guardian gods) pull the head of the snake 'Shesha' while on the right side 54 'asuras' (demon gods) pull the snake's tail in the opposite direction. In this myth, the body of the snake is wrapped around the central mountain—Mt. Meru—perhaps corresponding here to the Bayon temple at the center of the site. In any case, the myth relates that as the Devas pulled the snake in one direction and the gods pushed in the other, the ocean began to churn and precipitate the elements. By alternating back and forth, the ocean was "milked", forming the earth and the cosmos anew.
Not a member?Join