Colonial architecture - Stock Image

Signature Collection
  • S
  • M
  • L
Standard license only
You need XX iStock Credits to download this photo
You need 1 iStock Credit to download this photo
Already have credits or subscription? Sign in

You've got XX/XX downloads / remaining.

Having troubles with the download? Start downloading

You can return to re-download this image at any time before your subscription term ends.

You have 0 subscription downloads left

It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the but you've still got XX iStock credits in your account.
It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the .
You can still download this image with iStock credits.

Unable to download file

We're unable to process your download at this time. Please try again later. If the problem persists, contact us.
Description
Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. It consists of many of the buildings that, from 1699 to 1780, formed colonial Virginia's capital. The capital straddled the boundary of two of the original shires of Virginia, James City Shire (now James City County), and Charles River Shire (now York County). For most of the 18th century, Williamsburg was the center of government, education and culture in the Colony of Virginia. It was here that Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, James Monroe, James Madison, George Wythe, Peyton Randolph, and dozens more helped mold democracy in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States.

The motto of Colonial Williamsburg is "that the future may learn from the past." The Historic Area is meant to be an interpretation of a Colonial American city, with exhibits including dozens of authentic or accurately-recreated colonial houses and relating to American Revolutionary War history. Prominent buildings in Colonial Williamsburg include the Raleigh Tavern, the Capitol, The Governor's Palace, and Bruton Parish Church. However, rather than simply an effort to preserve antiquity, the combination of extensive restoration and thoughtful recreation of the entire colonial town facilitates envisioning the atmosphere and understanding the ideals of 18th century American revolutionary leaders. Interpreters work, dress, and talk as they did in the era, teaching visitors more about the site.
Not a member?Join