Domes Church of Our Savior on the Spilled Blood - Stock image

Cathedral, Church, Church of the Savior on Blood, Europe, Famous Place

Domes Church of Our Savior on the Spilled Blood royalty-free stock photo
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Domes Church of Our Savior on the Spilled Blood royalty-free stock photo

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Stock photo ID:185133175
Upload date:October 15, 2013

Description

This marvelous Russian-style church was built on the spot where Emperor Alexander II was assassinated in March 1881. After assuming power in 1855 in the wake of Russia’s disastrous defeat in the Crimean war against Britain, France and Turkey, Alexander II initiated a number of reforms. In 1861 he freed the Russian serfs (peasants, who were almost enslaved to their owners) from their ties to their masters and undertook a rigorous program of military, judicial and urban reforms, never before attempted in Russia. However, during the second half of his reign Alexander II grew wary of the dangers of his system of reforms, having only barely survived a series of attempts on his life, including an explosion in the Winter Palace and the derailment of a train. Alexander II was finally assassinated in 1881 by a group of revolutionaries, who threw a bomb at his royal carriage.
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