H1N1 Flu Vaccine Shortage concept - III - Stock image

Emergency Sign, Flu Mask, Medical Supplies, Medicine, Newspaper

H1N1 Flu Vaccine Shortage concept - III royalty-free stock photo
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H1N1 Flu Vaccine Shortage concept - III royalty-free stock photo

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This image is for editorial use only? Editorial use only photos don't have any model or property releases, which means they can't be used for commercial, promotional, advertorial or endorsement purposes. This type of content is intended to be used in connection with events that are newsworthy or of general interest (for example, in a blog, textbook, newspaper or magazine article).
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Stock photo ID:176120086
Upload date:August 08, 2013

Description

'Flu Shot (Vaccine) concept image - contains self-made newspaper headline with health content, red tablets (pills), Flu Mask, Syringe for Vaccination with needle. Shortage of flu vaccine will prevent some people to get needed protection against H1N1 flu virus.A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and ''remember'' it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters. Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or ''wild'' pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine). The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variol'
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