Krutitsy Patriarchal Metochion at sunset - Stock image

Built Structure, Cathedral, Church, Museum, Russia

Krutitsy Patriarchal Metochion at sunset royalty-free stock photo
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Krutitsy Patriarchal Metochion at sunset royalty-free stock photo

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Stock photo ID:117943587
Upload date:June 30, 2011

Description

Krutitsy Metochion, full name: Krutitsy Patriarchal Metochion is an operating ecclesiastical estate of Russian Orthodox Church, located in Tagansky District of Moscow, Russia, 3 kilometers south-east from the Kremlin. The name Krutitsy (pl.), i.e. steep river banks, originally meant the hills immediately east from Yauza River. Krutitsy Metochion, established in late 13th century, contains listed historical buildings erected in late 17th century on site of earlier 16th century foundations. After a brief period of prosperity in 17th century, Krutitsy was shut down by imperial authorities in 1780s, and served as a military warehouse for nearly two centuries. It was restored by Petr Baranovsky and gradually opened to the public after World War II; in 1991-1996, Krutitsy was returned to the Church and re-established as the personal metochion of Patriarch of Moscow and all Russia.
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