Monument to the Ghetto Jewish Heroes - Warsaw, Poland - Stock Image

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Description
The Ghetto Heroes Monument (Polish: Pomnik Bohaterów Getta) is a monument in Warsaw, Poland, commemorating the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943 during the Second World War. It is located in the area which was formerly a part of the Warsaw Ghetto, at the spot where the first armed clash of the uprising took place.

The monument was built partly of Nazi German materials originally brought to Warsaw in 1942 by Albert Speer for his planned works. The completed monument was formally unveiled in April 1948.

The monument was raised in the square of Anielewicza Street, Karmelicka Street, Lewartowskiego Street and Zamenhofa Street. From August 1942 until the end of the Warsaw ghetto this was the last location of the Judenrat. Also the site witnessed several clashes between the Warsaw Ghetto Jewish partisans and the German and auxiliary troops.

The new, larger monument, sculpted by Nathan Rapoport (who worked under the supervision of Suzin), was unveiled on April 19, 1948.The monument stands 11 meters (36 ft) tall. As Rapoport himself explained, the "wall" of the monument was designed to evoke not just the Ghetto walls, but also the Western Wall (Kotel) in Jerusalem.The great stones would thus have "framed the memory of events in Warsaw in the iconographic figure of Judaism's holiest site". The western part of the monument shows a bronze group sculpture of insurgents - men, women and children, armed with guns and Molotov cocktails.The central standing figure of this frieze is that of Mordechai Anielewicz (1919 – 8 May 1943) who was the leader of Żydowska Organizacja Bojowa (English: Jewish Combat Organization), also known as the ŻOB, during the uprising.


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