'Papa & Rangi' Sculpture by Brian Woodward & Ken Blum - Stock Image

This image is for editorial use only.

1 credit

XX credits

Signature Collection
  • S
  • M
  • L
Standard license only

You need XX iStock Credits to download this photo

You need 1 iStock Credit to download this photo

You've got XX/XX downloads / remaining.

Having troubles with the download? Start downloading

You can return to re-download this image at any time before your subscription term ends.

You have 0 subscription downloads left

It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the but you've still got XX iStock credits in your account.
It looks like you're out of subscription downloads for the .
You can still download this image with iStock credits.

Unable to download file

We're unable to process your download at this time. Please try again later. If the problem persists, contact us.
Caption
Nelson, New Zealand - November 30, 2011. Close-Up of Iconic Papa & Rangi Sculpture at Arts Unique, next to the enterance to the Abel Tasman National Park, Marahau, Tasman Region, New Zealand.
Description
Marahau's Art Unique sculpture trail began it's life 16 years ago, brought to life by Brian (Woody) Woodward.

Papatuanuku and Ranginui (Papa & Rangi), the Maori gods of sky and earth are lovingly carved into the base of an immense tree trunk and situated opposite the enterance to the Abel Tasman National Park where they greet trampers leaving the Park.

This iconic Sculpture was carved from a giant Macrocarpa log by Australian artists Brain Woodward and Ken Blum. The log stands like a rough tree with the two faces carved into it's trunk. The Maori tattoo or Moko was created by John Motu, a master carver from the Motueka Marae.

The Maori Legend of Papa and Rangi tells of
Papa (Earth Mother) and Rangi (Sky Father) whose love for each other was so strong they smothered each other. Eventually their children, forced to live in darkness between them, force them apart. It is said that even now when it rains Papa's tears fall down on Rangi, whose tears are springs of water that mix with the rain and run into streams through the forest to the sea and finally rising as mist to her lover in the sky. Sometimes Papatuanuku heaves and strains and almost breaks herself apart to reach her beloved partner again but it is to no avail.

nz_editorial_zps053371cd
.
maoritanga
.
kiwiana
.
nz_aotearoa
.
Not a member?Join