UK Budget Highlights - Stock Image

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Description
The Chancellor of the Exchequer presents the UK fiscal Budget, contained within the traditional red briefcase. Post it Notes are for highlighting key changes in the Budget announcement, such as, Pink for increases in taxation, etc, Green for reductions in taxation or general tax benefits and Yellow for neutral announcements. Good copy space. Isolated on white. The United Kingdom Budget statement is made by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, a member of the Government who is responsible for all economic and financial matters. He controls and is responsible for HM Treasury and the revenues gathered by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs and the expenditure of public sector departments. He raises and lowers taxes and duties according to the needs of the economy. After the Prime Minister he is the most important state officer. The Budget is normally an annual event in March, but in more recent times a mini budget has also been held in November. The budget speech is always carried to the House of Commons in a red briefcase, known as Ministerial Boxes, or Red Boxes’. This red briefcase has become representative of the annual UK Budget. Historically, it dates back to the first use by William Gladstone in 1860.
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