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Wild mint Mentha aquatica blocking a stream - Stock Image

Stock Photo: 14133999
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Description

The well-known herb wild mint (Mentha aquatica) has had many uses in England, being recorded here since the 9th century. It's use in a sauce to accompany lamb is as traditional as roast beef on Sundays. It is also a source for one of the more common essential oils used in aromatherapy, the leaves being very powerfully scented when crushed. The various mints belong to the flower family Lamiaceae.

Associations between mint and mankind go back to beyond 1000BC, from which time dried mint leaves were found in Egyptian pyramids. Roman poet Ovid wrote of two peasants who scoured their serving board with mint before feeding guests. Strewn on the floors of temples and places where feasts and banquets were held, mint would freshen the air and also deter mice.

Wild mint is also known as water mint, marsh mint and hairy mint.

More photographs of wild mint:

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