Hemlock Tree Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

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Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) infestation on underside of eastern hemlock branch in Connecticut. This tiny sapsucking insect from Asia, discovered in Virginia in 1951, is a major killer of eastern hemlocks, which are vitally important to Northeastern forest ecosystems. HWA is named for its woolly egg masses. Thanks to introduction of the Japanese ladybeetle, a predator of HWA, many hemlocks in Connecticut have survived since the first waves of tree mortality some 35 years ago.

Very Rare, Beautifully Illustrated Antique Engraved Victorian Botanical Illustration of Forest Trees and Plants: Plate 44, from The Book of Practical Botany in Word and Image (Lehrbuch der praktischen Pflanzenkunde in Wort und Bild), Published in 1886. Copyright has expired on this artwork. Digitally restored.

Very Rare, Beautifully Illustrated Antique Engraved Victorian Botanical Illustration of European Larch Tree or Pinus Larix: Plate 43, from The Book of Practical Botany in Word and Image (Lehrbuch der praktischen Pflanzenkunde in Wort und Bild), Published in 1886. Copyright has expired on this artwork. Digitally restored.

Vector sketch illustration. Black silhouette of Eastern or Canadian Hemlock isolated on white background. Drawing of coniferous Tsuga Canadensis, Pennsylvania state tree.

Very Rare, Beautifully Illustrated Antique Engraved Victorian Botanical Illustration of Forest Trees and Species: Plate 43, from The Book of Practical Botany in Word and Image (Lehrbuch der praktischen Pflanzenkunde in Wort und Bild), Published in 1886. Copyright has expired on this artwork. Digitally restored.

Conifers (Pinophyta), wood engravings, published in 1897 Conifers (Pinophyta), top: 1) Platycladus orientalis (Biota orientalis); 2) Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Chamaccyparis Lawsoniana); 3) Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera plumosa); 4) Mediterranean cypress (Cupressus fastigiata); 5) Chilean pine (Araucaria imbricata); 6) Brazilian pine (Auracaria brasiliensis); 7) Gingko biloba; 8) Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum); 9) Yew (Taxus baccata fastigiata); 10) Redwood (Sequoia gigantea); 11) Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica); 12) Stone pine (Pinus pinea); 13) Blue spruce (Picea pungens); 14) Red fir (Abies  magnifica). Bottom, left: 1) Giant redwood, twig with cone and seed (a); 2) Stone pine, cone and seed (2a); 3) Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani), cone; 4) Canadian hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), twig with ripe (a) and unripe (b) cone, scale (c), needle (d); 5) Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, or Pseudotsuga douglasi), cone and seed (a); 6) Noble fir (Abies procera, or Abies nobilis), cone; 7) Spanish fir (Abies pinsapo), cone and seed (a); 8) White spruce (Picea glauca, or Picea alba) with cone (a), female blossom (b), scale (c), needle (d). Buttom right: 1) Kahikatea  (Podocarpus dacrydioides); 2) Celerytop pine (Phyllocladus aspleniifolius, or Phyllocladus glauca), female blossom branch, sterile leaf (a); 3) Sandarac tree (Tetraclinis articulata, or Callitris quadrivalvis), stamen (a), seed (b); 4) Mediterranean cypress (or Cupressus sempervirens); 5) Incense cedar (Libocedrus decurrens), opened (a) and closed (b) fruit, seed (c); 6) Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum), stamen (a); 7) Agathis dammara (or Dammara orientalis), stamen (a); 8) Japanese torreya (Torreya nucifera), fruit (a - cross section); 9) Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera); 10) Japanese sugi pine (Cryptomeria japonica), scale (a); 11) Syrian juniper (Juniperus drupacea); 12) Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia, or Auracaria brasiliensis), scale (a), leaf from a fruit dwarf (b), leaf from a sterile branch; 13) Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum). hemlock tree stock illustrations
Conifers (Pinophyta), wood engravings, published in 1897 Conifers (Pinophyta), top: 1) Platycladus orientalis (Biota orientalis); 2) Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Chamaccyparis Lawsoniana); 3) Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera plumosa); 4) Mediterranean cypress (Cupressus fastigiata); 5) Chilean pine (Araucaria imbricata); 6) Brazilian pine (Auracaria brasiliensis); 7) Gingko biloba; 8) Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum); 9) Yew (Taxus baccata fastigiata); 10) Redwood (Sequoia gigantea); 11) Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica); 12) Stone pine (Pinus pinea); 13) Blue spruce (Picea pungens); 14) Red fir (Abies magnifica). Bottom, left: 1) Giant redwood, twig with cone and seed (a); 2) Stone pine, cone and seed (2a); 3) Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani), cone; 4) Canadian hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), twig with ripe (a) and unripe (b) cone, scale (c), needle (d); 5) Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, or Pseudotsuga douglasi), cone and seed (a); 6) Noble fir (Abies procera, or Abies nobilis), cone; 7) Spanish fir (Abies pinsapo), cone and seed (a); 8) White spruce (Picea glauca, or Picea alba) with cone (a), female blossom (b), scale (c), needle (d). Buttom right: 1) Kahikatea (Podocarpus dacrydioides); 2) Celerytop pine (Phyllocladus aspleniifolius, or Phyllocladus glauca), female blossom branch, sterile leaf (a); 3) Sandarac tree (Tetraclinis articulata, or Callitris quadrivalvis), stamen (a), seed (b); 4) Mediterranean cypress (or Cupressus sempervirens); 5) Incense cedar (Libocedrus decurrens), opened (a) and closed (b) fruit, seed (c); 6) Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum), stamen (a); 7) Agathis dammara (or Dammara orientalis), stamen (a); 8) Japanese torreya (Torreya nucifera), fruit (a - cross section); 9) Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera); 10) Japanese sugi pine (Cryptomeria japonica), scale (a); 11) Syrian juniper (Juniperus drupacea); 12) Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia, or Auracaria brasiliensis), scale (a), leaf from a fruit dwarf (b), leaf from a sterile branch; 13) Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum). hemlock tree stock illustrations

Conifers (Pinophyta), top: 1) Platycladus orientalis (Biota orientalis); 2) Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Chamaccyparis Lawsoniana); 3) Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera plumosa); 4) Mediterranean cypress (Cupressus fastigiata); 5) Chilean pine (Araucaria imbricata); 6) Brazilian pine (Auracaria brasiliensis); 7) Gingko biloba; 8) Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum); 9) Yew (Taxus baccata fastigiata); 10) Redwood (Sequoia gigantea); 11) Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica); 12) Stone pine (Pinus pinea); 13) Blue spruce (Picea pungens); 14) Red fir (Abies magnifica). Bottom, left: 1) Giant redwood, twig with cone and seed (a); 2) Stone pine, cone and seed (2a); 3) Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani), cone; 4) Canadian hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), twig with ripe (a) and unripe (b) cone, scale (c), needle (d); 5) Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, or Pseudotsuga douglasi), cone and seed (a); 6) Noble fir (Abies procera, or Abies nobilis), cone; 7) Spanish fir (Abies pinsapo), cone and seed (a); 8) White spruce (Picea glauca, or Picea alba) with cone (a), female blossom (b), scale (c), needle (d). Buttom right: 1) Kahikatea (Podocarpus dacrydioides); 2) Celerytop pine (Phyllocladus aspleniifolius, or Phyllocladus glauca), female blossom branch, sterile leaf (a); 3) Sandarac tree (Tetraclinis articulata, or Callitris quadrivalvis), stamen (a), seed (b); 4) Mediterranean cypress (or Cupressus sempervirens); 5) Incense cedar (Libocedrus decurrens), opened (a) and closed (b) fruit, seed (c); 6) Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum), stamen (a); 7) Agathis dammara (or Dammara orientalis), stamen (a); 8) Japanese torreya (Torreya nucifera), fruit (a - cross section); 9) Sawara cypress (Chamaecyparis pisifera); 10) Japanese sugi pine (Cryptomeria japonica), scale (a); 11) Syrian juniper (Juniperus drupacea); 12) Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia, or Auracaria brasiliensis), scale (a), leaf from a fruit dwarf (b), leaf from a sterile branch; 13) Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum).

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