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Jeff Goulden Crater Lake National Park Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

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An eruption occurred 70,000 years ago and formed the pink, buff and orange Pumice Castle formation on what is now the east side of Crater Lake. Subsequently it was buried by the Redcloud Cliff flow and then exposed when Mount Mazama erupted and its caldera collapsed. Rain and wind have since finished the job of carving the pumice into its hoodoo shaped formations. Pumice Castle sits about 1,300 feet above the surface of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

Garfield Peak, at 7,976 feet above sea level, is a prominent peak at the south end of Crater Lake near the Crater Lake Lodge. Garfield Peak was named for James Rudolph Garfield, the Secretary of the Interior for President Theodore Roosevelt who, in 1902, signed the bill creating the national park. Garfield was the son of President James Garfield. Garfield Peak, photographed here at sunset, is in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

Crater Lake Lodge was built in 1915 to provide overnight accommodation for visitors to Crater Lake. The lodge is located on the southwest rim, 1,000 feet above Crater Lake. In 1967, the National Park Service acquired the Crater Lake Lodge and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. The building continued to deteriorate due to the harsh environment and lack of funds for maintenance. Despite being listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the National Park Service scheduled the building to be demolished. The decision was later reversed due to public opposition. In 1988, the National Park Service approved a plan to rebuild the lodge as part of a comprehensive effort to redevelop the entire Rim Village. Crater Lake Lodge is located in Crater Lake National Park, yyy, USA.

The Sinnott Memorial Observation Station is a sheltered viewpoint and museum built into the caldera wall above the south end of Crater Lake. The building is architecturally significant because it was the first museum built by the National Park Service. It was also the first structure built around Crater Lake to use rustic stone masonry construction. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 1, 1988. The Sinnott Memorial Overlook is located in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

Crater Lake Lodge was built in 1915 to provide overnight accommodation for visitors to Crater Lake. The lodge is located on the southwest rim, 1,000 feet above Crater Lake. In 1967, the National Park Service acquired the Crater Lake Lodge and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. The building continued to deteriorate due to the harsh environment and lack of funds for maintenance. Despite being listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the National Park Service scheduled the building to be demolished. The decision was later reversed due to public opposition. In 1988, the National Park Service approved a plan to rebuild the lodge as part of a comprehensive effort to redevelop the entire Rim Village. Crater Lake Lodge is located in Crater Lake National Park, yyy, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

Garfield Peak, at 7,976 feet above sea level, is a prominent peak at the south end of Crater Lake near the Crater Lake Lodge. Garfield Peak was named for James Rudolph Garfield, the Secretary of the Interior for President Theodore Roosevelt who, in 1902, signed the bill creating the national park. Garfield was the son of President James Garfield. Garfield Peak, photographed here at sunset, is in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) is a medium sized, mostly brown, gray, and yellow bird named for its wax-like wing tips. It has a distinctive crest on its head and a black eye mask. The waxwing's diet includes cedar cones, fruit, and insects. Some favorite foods include the fruit of Indian Plum and Mountain Ash trees. This Cedar Waxwing was photographed in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) is a medium sized, mostly brown, gray, and yellow bird named for its wax-like wing tips. It has a distinctive crest on its head and a black eye mask. The waxwing's diet includes cedar cones, fruit, and insects. Some favorite foods include the fruit of Indian Plum and Mountain Ash trees. This Cedar Waxwing was photographed in Crater Lake National Park, yyy, USA.

The Pinnacles are towering needle-like formations of rock, called fossil fumaroles, that project from the bottom of Sand Creek Canyon. They were formed under sheets of volcanic pumice that preceded the collapse of Mount Mazama. As the surface of the hot pumice cooled, steam and gases were released through vents and tubes. The tubes were welded into cement hardness by the passage of the gases. Erosion later removed most of the softer surrounding ash and pumice, leaving the tall pinnacles and spires. The Pinnacles are southeast of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA - September 25, 2012: Crater Lake Lodge was built in 1915 to provide overnight accommodation for visitors to Crater Lake. The lodge is located on the southwest rim, 1,000 feet above Crater Lake. In 1967, the National Park Service acquired the Crater Lake Lodge and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. The building continued to deteriorate due to the harsh environment and lack of funds for maintenance. Despite being listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the National Park Service scheduled the building to be demolished. The decision was later reversed due to public opposition. In 1988, the National Park Service approved a plan to rebuild the lodge as part of a comprehensive effort to redevelop the entire Rim Village. Crater Lake Lodge is located in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pinnacles are towering needle-like formations of rock, called fossil fumaroles, that project from the bottom of Sand Creek Canyon. They were formed under sheets of volcanic pumice that preceded the collapse of Mount Mazama. As the surface of the hot pumice cooled, steam and gases were released through vents and tubes. The tubes were welded into cement hardness by the passage of the gases. Erosion later removed most of the softer surrounding ash and pumice, leaving the tall pinnacles and spires. The Pinnacles are southeast of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pinnacles are towering needle-like formations of rock, called fossil fumaroles, that project from the bottom of Sand Creek Canyon. They were formed under sheets of volcanic pumice that preceded the collapse of Mount Mazama. As the surface of the hot pumice cooled, steam and gases were released through vents and tubes. The tubes were welded into cement hardness by the passage of the gases. Erosion later removed most of the softer surrounding ash and pumice, leaving the tall pinnacles and spires. The Pinnacles are southeast of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pinnacles are towering needle-like formations of rock, called fossil fumaroles, that project from the bottom of Sand Creek Canyon. They were formed under sheets of volcanic pumice that preceded the collapse of Mount Mazama. As the surface of the hot pumice cooled, steam and gases were released through vents and tubes. The tubes were welded into cement hardness by the passage of the gases. Erosion later removed most of the softer surrounding ash and pumice, leaving the tall pinnacles and spires. The Pinnacles are southeast of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pinnacles are towering needle-like formations of rock, called fossil fumaroles, that project from the bottom of Sand Creek Canyon. They were formed under sheets of volcanic pumice that preceded the collapse of Mount Mazama. As the surface of the hot pumice cooled, steam and gases were released through vents and tubes. The tubes were welded into cement hardness by the passage of the gases. Erosion later removed most of the softer surrounding ash and pumice, leaving the tall pinnacles and spires. The Pinnacles are southeast of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

Crater Lake Lodge was built in 1915 to provide overnight accommodation for visitors to Crater Lake. The lodge is located on the southwest rim, 1,000 feet above Crater Lake. In 1967, the National Park Service acquired the Crater Lake Lodge and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. The building continued to deteriorate due to the harsh environment and lack of funds for maintenance. Despite being listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the National Park Service scheduled the building to be demolished. The decision was later reversed due to public opposition. In 1988, the National Park Service approved a plan to rebuild the lodge as part of a comprehensive effort to redevelop the entire Rim Village. Crater Lake Lodge is located in Crater Lake National Park, yyy, USA.

At 8,049 feet above sea level, Llao Rock is the largest and most prominent high point on the north rim of Crater Lake. The rock pillar is named after Llao, a Native American deity. Llao Rock was created by a large rhydocite lava flow 200 years prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama. When Mount Mazama erupted and the caldera was created, a large portion of Llao Rock fell into the caldera. Llao Rock and Hillman Peak are located in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

An eruption occurred 70,000 years ago and formed the pink, buff and orange Pumice Castle formation on what is now the east side of Crater Lake. Subsequently it was buried by the Redcloud Cliff flow and then exposed when Mount Mazama erupted and its caldera collapsed. Rain and wind have since finished the job of carving the pumice into its hoodoo shaped formations. Pumice Castle sits about 1,300 feet above the surface of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

An eruption occurred 70,000 years ago and formed the pink, buff and orange Pumice Castle formation on what is now the east side of Crater Lake. Subsequently it was buried by the Redcloud Cliff flow and then exposed when Mount Mazama erupted and its caldera collapsed. Rain and wind have since finished the job of carving the pumice into its hoodoo shaped formations. Pumice Castle sits about 1,300 feet above the surface of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pumice Desert is a conspicuous natural feature near Crater Lake. Prior to the eruption of Mount Mazama over 7,700 years ago, the Pumice Desert was a deep glacial valley. The valley was buried by pumice ejected during the eruptions and subsequent avalanches of pumice and scoria deposits. These deposits may exceed 200 feet in depth, hindering plant growth and contributing to the desert-like landscape. Even after thousands of years, few trees have become established on the Pumice Desert. This is in sharp contrast to the surrounding lodgepole pine forests. Ample water exists under the surface but deficiencies in the soil inhibit plant growth. Pumice Desert is about 6 miles north of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

The Pinnacles are towering needle-like formations of rock, called fossil fumaroles, that project from the bottom of Sand Creek Canyon. They were formed under sheets of volcanic pumice that preceded the collapse of Mount Mazama. As the surface of the hot pumice cooled, steam and gases were released through vents and tubes. The tubes were welded into cement hardness by the passage of the gases. Erosion later removed most of the softer surrounding ash and pumice, leaving the tall pinnacles and spires. The Pinnacles are southeast of Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA.

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