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Jeff Goulden Environmental Conservation Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

Browse 120+ jeff goulden environmental conservation stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images.

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In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. This was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from the Sunset Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The American Pika (Ochotona princeps) is an herbivorous, smaller relative of the rabbit. These cute rodents can be found in the mountains of western North America usually above the tree line in large boulder fields. The pika could become the first mammal in United States to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a result of global climate change. This pika was found near Mount Fremont, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

Grand Coulee Dam is a concrete dam on the Columbia River built to generate hydroelectric power and provide irrigation water. The dam and original two powerhouses were constructed between 1933 and 1942. Power from the dam fueled the growing industries of the Pacific Northwest in the 1940’s and 1950’s and also helped win World War II. Construction of the dam created Lake Roosevelt and forced the relocation of over 3,000 people including many Native Americans whose ancestral land was flooded. A third powerhouse was completed in 1974 making Grand Coulee Dam the largest power station in the United States. Grand Coulee Dam was photographed from Crown Point at Crown Point State Park near Grand Coulee, Washington State, USA.

The Vancouver SkyTrain is a medium-capacity rapid transit system. It serves the Metropolitan Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada area. The SkyTrain has almost 50 miles of track and uses fully automated trains. The track is grade-separated on underground and elevated guideways. The trains cross the Fraser River on the worlds second-longest cable-supported transit bridge. This photograph of the Sky Train was taken after it crossed the Fraser River in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada.

Grand Coulee Dam is a concrete dam on the Columbia River built to generate hydroelectric power and provide irrigation water. The dam and original two powerhouses were constructed between 1933 and 1942. Power from the dam fueled the growing industries of the Pacific Northwest in the 1940’s and 1950’s and also helped win World War II. Construction of the dam created Lake Roosevelt and forced the relocation of over 3,000 people including many Native Americans whose ancestral land was flooded. A third powerhouse was completed in 1974 making Grand Coulee Dam the largest power station in the United States. Grand Coulee Dam was photographed from Crown Point at Crown Point State Park near Grand Coulee, Washington State, USA.

Walnut Canyon Lakes in the Fall Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife.  1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs.  2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity.  3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area.  4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use.  5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods.  Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden environmental conservation stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Walnut Canyon Lakes in the Fall Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden environmental conservation stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. These turbines operate in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

The American Pika (Ochotona princeps) is an herbivorous, smaller relative of the rabbit. These cute rodents can be found in the mountains of western North America usually above the tree line in large boulder fields. The pika could become the first mammal in United States to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a result of global climate change. This pika was found near Mount Fremont, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

The Park Point Fire Lookout in was constructed in 1939 by the Civilian Conservation Corp using a rustic design in order to blend with the surrounding area. It is constructed of native sandstone and has a unique octagonal floor plan. The building is an example of the 1920s National Park Service Rustic style that adapted buildings and other structures to blend with their surroundings. The fire lookout is located on Park Point at 8,572 feet above sea level, the highest point in Mesa Verde National Park near Cortez, Colorado, USA.

Landslides occur when a slope, or a portion of it, undergoes some processes that make it unstable. This decreases the shear strength of the slope material, causing gravity to carry the material downhill. A landslide may be caused by excess water, earthquakes, or any combination of other factors acting together or alone. The landslide in the far left of the picture and the resulting chasm were photographed from the Copper Canyon Trail in the Prescott National Forest near Camp Verde, Arizona, USA.

In the 1930's the owners of Crescent Moon Ranch installed a water wheel in their irrigation ditch. Falling water spun the wheel, driving a water pump and an electric generator. This system pumped water to storage tanks and brough power to the ranch. Crescent Moon Ranch is in the Coconino National Forest near Sedona, Arizona, USA.

Greater Sedona and the Verde Valley are areas of uncommon beauty and diversity in the desert of Northern Arizona. It is known for its wide-open vistas, red-rock buttes, steep wooded canyons, pine forests and riparian corridors. Nearby Oak Creek, West Fork and the Verde River provide cool green shade in the spring and summer and a kaleidoscope of color in the fall. Much of this region is within the Coconino National Forest which includes several designated national wilderness areas. This scene of modern pueblo development near red rock and contrasting green trees was photographed at Boynton Canyon in the Red Rock Secret Mountain Wilderness near Sedona, Arizona, USA.

The canola plant produces beautiful fields of yellow flowers when the plants are blooming. Besides the beautiful flowers, the canola seed is crushed and the primary byproducts are cooking oil, biodiesel fuel and meal for livestock feed. As of 2014, there were more than 43,000 acres of canola planted in Washington State, producing a crop worth about $13 million. Washington State, ranks 4th in the nation in canola production behind North Dakota, Oklahoma and Montana. This field of canola in bloom was photographed in Adams County near Washtucna, Washington State, USA.

The Radio Fire on Mount Elden started June 17, 1977. The devastating fire consumed more than 5,000 acres. After more than 40 years later much of the vegetation, such as the conifer forest, has still not grown back. This scene of the aftermath was photographed from the Sunset Trail in Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. This turbine operates in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. These turbines operate in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

The Radio Fire on Mount Elden started June 17, 1977. The devastating fire consumed more than 5,000 acres. After more than 40 years later much of the vegetation, such as the conifer forest, has still not grown back. This scene of the aftermath was photographed from the Sunset Trail in Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. These turbines operate in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. These turbines operate in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

In the 1930's the owners of Crescent Moon Ranch installed a water wheel in their irrigation ditch. Falling water spun the wheel, driving a water pump and an electric generator. This system pumped water to storage tanks and brough power to the ranch. Crescent Moon Ranch is in the Coconino National Forest near Sedona, Arizona, USA.

Grand Coulee Dam is a concrete dam on the Columbia River built to generate hydroelectric power and provide irrigation water. The dam and original two powerhouses were constructed between 1933 and 1942. Power from the dam fueled the growing industries of the Pacific Northwest in the 1940’s and 1950’s and also helped win World War II. Construction of the dam created Lake Roosevelt and forced the relocation of over 3,000 people including many Native Americans whose ancestral land was flooded. A third powerhouse was completed in 1974 making Grand Coulee Dam the largest power station in the United States. Grand Coulee Dam was photographed from Crown Point at Crown Point State Park near Grand Coulee, Washington State, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. The was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from Brookbank Meadow in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. The was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from Brookbank Meadow in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. The was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from Brookbank Meadow in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. This turbine operates in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

Aspen trees need direct sunlight to grow. When mixed conifer forests burn, open areas are created where aspens can take hold and thrive. Aspen forests, when established, provide the shade necessary for mixed conifers to once again become established. This burn area is in the process of becoming a vibrant aspen grove. The aspen grove is on Highway 67 in the Kaibab National Forest near Jacob Lake, Arizona, USA.

The American Pika (Ochotona princeps) is an herbivorous, smaller relative of the rabbit. These cute rodents can be found in the mountains of western North America usually above the tree line in large boulder fields. The pika could become the first mammal in United States to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a result of global climate change. This pika was found near Palisades Lake in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

The Palouse is a rich agricultural area encompassing much of southeastern Washington State and parts of Idaho. It is characterized by low rolling hills mostly devoid of trees. Photographers are drawn to the Palouse for its wide open landscapes and ever changing colors. In the spring it is a visual mosaic of green. This picture was taken at Steptoe Butte State Park near Colfax, Washington State, USA.

Olympic National Park, located in the north-west corner of Washington State, is the most diverse national park in the USA. The central core of the park has high glaciated mountains and alpine meadows. Surrounding this central region are old growth and temperate rain forests. The park also protects over 70 miles of Pacific Coast wilderness. This view of a fire ravaged hillside was photographed from Hurricane Ridge near Port Angeles, Washington State, USA.

Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park. It was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition. Because of its regular eruptions of every 44 minutes to two hours it was given the name Old Faithful. This scene was photographed from Upper Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Walnut Canyon Lakes Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife.  1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs.  2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity.  3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area.  4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use.  5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods.  Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden environmental conservation stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Walnut Canyon Lakes Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden environmental conservation stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. This fire was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was finally brought under control. This Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa), thriving while growing horizontally along the ground, is an example of remarkable adaptation, likely influenced by environmental conditions or stress factors. Unfortunately, the Museum Fire ultimately led to the demise of this Ponderosa Pine. The intense heat and flames from the fire would have posed a significant threat to the tree, and its ability to survive in a horizontal position on the ground likely made it more vulnerable to the fire's effects. This unique tree was photographed from the Brookbank Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. This was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from the Brookbank Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Walnut Canyon Lakes Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife.  1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs.  2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity.  3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area.  4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use.  5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods.  Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden environmental conservation stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Walnut Canyon Lakes Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden environmental conservation stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Installed wind power capacity in Washington State has grown in recent years and the state now ranks among the top ten in the nation with the most wind power installed. As of 2016, wind energy accounted for 7.1% of all energy generated in Washington State. These turbines operate in the Kittitas Valley near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

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