Jeff Goulden Flagstaff Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

Browse 2,700+ jeff goulden flagstaff stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images.

Most popular

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these are Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the snow-capped peaks reflected in a pond was taken from Kachina Wetlands in Kachina Village, Arizona, USA.

Sixty million years ago the west side of Bright Angel Fault was lifted higher than the east side, creating the canyon that we now see. The exposed walls of Bright Angel Canyon allow us to see the geological history of the area. Tropical seas, coastal beaches, sand dunes, swamps, lagoons, and Sahara-like deserts are represented by the horizontal layers that are exposed. The upper five layers of stacked rock records 70 million years of rising and falling sea levels. The limestone layers represent shallow sea environments, sandstone layers mean sandy beaches or dunes, while shale layers translate to mud flats, swamps, or coastal plains. This picture of Bright Angel Canyon was taken at sunrise from Bright Angel Point on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these are Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the snow-capped peaks reflected in a pond was taken from Kachina Wetlands in Kachina Village, Arizona, USA.

The Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) gets its name from the way the leaves quake in the wind. The aspens grow in large colonies, often starting from a single seedling and spreading underground only to sprout another tree nearby. For this reason, it is considered to be one of the largest single organisms in nature. During the spring and summer, the aspens use sunlight and chlorophyll to create food necessary for the tree’s growth. In the fall, as the days get shorter and colder, the naturally green chlorophyll breaks down and the leaves stop producing food. Other pigments are now visible, causing the leaves to take on beautiful orange and gold colors. These colors can vary from year to year depending on weather conditions. For instance, when autumn is warm and rainy, the leaves are less colorful. This fall scene of gold colored aspens was photographed by the Inner Basin Trail in Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) gets its name from the way the leaves quake in the wind. The aspens grow in large colonies, often starting from a single seedling and spreading underground only to sprout another tree nearby. For this reason, it is considered to be one of the largest single organisms in nature. During the spring and summer, the aspens use sunlight and chlorophyll to create food necessary for the tree’s growth. In the fall, as the days get shorter and colder, the naturally green chlorophyll breaks down and the leaves stop producing food. Other pigments are now visible, causing the leaves to take on beautiful orange and gold colors. These colors can vary from year to year depending on weather conditions. For instance, when autumn is warm and rainy, the leaves are less colorful. This woman hiker was walking through a fall scene of gold colored aspens on the Arizona Trail at Bismarck Lake in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. This was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from the Sunset Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Grand Falls is on the Little Colorado River near Leupp, Arizona, USA. The falls typically flow when there is heavy snowmelt in the spring and during the monsoon rains of late summer. Due to its dark brown color, Grand Falls is often called Chocolate Falls. The headwaters of the Little Colorado River are far to the south in the White Mountains of Southeast Arizona. The Little Colorado is a tributary of the Colorado River which starts in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The confluence of the two rivers is in nearby Grand Canyon National Park.

The Common Sunflower (Helianthus annus), a wild native of the American Southwest, is a member of the Asteraceae family. It has a well-known characteristic, called heliotropism, of pivoting its leaves and buds to track the path of the sun from sunrise to sunset. Once the flowers open, they are oriented to the east to greet the rising sun. The common sunflower thrives in the dry, brown disturbed soils of the southwest, turning the arid landscape into a shimmering yellow carpet that attracts wildlife, insects and human visitors alike. In Northern Arizona, the Navajo ancestors extracted a dark red dye from the outer seed coats and the Hopi cultivated a purple sunflower to make a special dye. The sunflower seed was an important food source for most North American tribes. The sunflower, with its large yellow flowers, is also an iconic art symbol and the state flower of Kansas. After the Summer Monsoon rains bring moisture to the region, sunflowers bloom in fields all over Northern Arizona. This field of sunflowers was photographed at Campbell Meadows in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) gets its name from the way the leaves quake in the wind. The aspens grow in large colonies, often starting from a single seedling and spreading underground only to sprout another tree nearby. For this reason, it is considered to be one of the largest single organisms in nature. During the spring and summer, the aspens use sunlight and chlorophyll to create food necessary for the tree’s growth. In the fall, as the days get shorter and colder, the naturally green chlorophyll breaks down and the leaves stop producing food. Other pigments are now visible, causing the leaves to take on beautiful orange and gold colors. These colors can vary from year to year depending on weather conditions. For instance, when autumn is warm and rainy, the leaves are less colorful. This fall scene of gold colored aspens was photographed at Hart Prairie in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. Kendrick Peak (10,423 feet) is in the background.

The Arizona Meteor Crater (Barringer Meteorite Crater) formed 50,000 years ago when an asteroid plunged through the Earth’s atmosphere and crashed into what is now central Arizona. This area was not populated by humans at the time. Because of Arizona’s dry climate and the crater’s relatively young age, Meteor Crater is the best preserved impact crater on Earth. The small asteroid was just 150 feet across. Traveling at around 8 miles per second the force of the impact was tremendous. In just a few seconds the crater was formed when millions of tons of rock were thrown out. Today Meteor Crater is a famous tourist attraction with a museum featuring displays about the history of the crater. Scientist from all over the world come to Meteor Crater to study it. Meteor Crater is near Winslow, Arizona, USA.

Anderson Mesa is a rolling 5 mile long mesa in the Coconino National Forest. The elevations are between 6200 and 7200 feet above sea level. It is characterized by wide open grasslands interspersed with pine and juniper forest. There are views of Lake Mary, Mormon Lake and the San Francisco Peaks. Seasonal wetlands and tanks populate the top of the mesa. Anderson Mesa is about 20 miles southeast of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni) is a Western North America subspecies of elk found in the Rocky Mountains and adjacent ranges. In the winter, elk are mostly found in lower elevation open forests and floodplain marshes. In the summer the elk migrates to the alpine meadows and subalpine forests. Elk can reside in a diverse range of habitats but are most often found in forests and forest edges. In mountainous regions they often stay at lower elevations in the winter and migrate to higher elevations during the warmer months. This herd of elk was photographed while grazing in a meadow on Campbell Mesa near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Between 1100AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the plains between the Painted Desert and the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. Today the remnants of their villages dot the landscape. Wupatki Pueblo is in Wupatki National Monument, established in 1924 to preserve this rich heritage. Wupatki National Monument is near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Walnut Canyon Lakes in the Fall Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife.  1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs.  2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity.  3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area.  4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use.  5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods.  Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden flagstaff stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Walnut Canyon Lakes in the Fall Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden flagstaff stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Reclaimed water is increasingly used for a variety of purposes, including the creation and maintenance of artificial lakes in arid regions like Northern Arizona. This practice has several benefits for both the environment and local wildlife. 1) Using reclaimed water for lake creation helps conserve precious freshwater resources. In regions with limited water availability, such as Northern Arizona, it is essential to find sustainable water sources to support ecosystems and human needs. 2) Artificial lakes created with reclaimed water can provide habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including fish, birds, and aquatic plants. These water bodies can attract and support various species, contributing to local biodiversity. 3) Reclaimed water can be used to restore or enhance natural wetlands and aquatic ecosystems that have been impacted by human activities or natural processes like drought. This can help rehabilitate degraded habitats and improve water quality in the area. 4) The use of treated reclaimed water for lake creation can improve water quality by reducing the discharge of pollutants into natural water bodies. Proper treatment ensures that the water is safe for both wildlife and recreational use. 5) In regions susceptible to drought, reclaimed water can provide a reliable source of water for lakes and ecosystems, reducing the dependence on limited freshwater sources and ensuring the continued survival of aquatic and avian species during dry periods. Walnut Canyon Lakes, pictured here, are in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Arizona doesn't have many natural ponds and lakes. Several communities in Northern Arizona have developed artificial lakes using reclaimed waste water. In addition to providing an area with aesthetic beauty, these lakes provide ideal habitat for wildlife. Photographed here is one of the Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Common Sunflower (Helianthus annus), a wild native of the American Southwest, is a member of the Asteraceae family. It has a well-known characteristic, called heliotropism, of pivoting its leaves and buds to track the path of the sun from sunrise to sunset. Once the flowers open, they are oriented to the east to greet the rising sun. The common sunflower thrives in the dry, brown disturbed soils of the southwest, turning the arid landscape into a shimmering yellow carpet that attracts wildlife, insects and human visitors alike. In Northern Arizona, the Navajo ancestors extracted a dark red dye from the outer seed coats and the Hopi cultivated a purple sunflower to make a special dye. The sunflower seed was an important food source for most North American tribes. The sunflower, with its large yellow flowers, is also an iconic art symbol and the state flower of Kansas. After the Summer Monsoon rains bring moisture to the region, sunflowers bloom in fields all over Northern Arizona. This field of sunflowers and the San Francisco Peaks was photographed at Buffalo Park in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Campbell Mesa is one of many wooded mesas in the Coconino National Forest of Northern Arizona. On the west side of the mesa are stands of Ponderosa Pine interspersed with oak groves, grassy meadows and wildflowers. On the east side the pine forest gives way to junipers and other scrub vegetation. Campbell Mesa was named after Hugh E. Campbell, a prosperous local sheep rancher from Nova Scotia, Canada. He was born on June 10, 1862 and came to Arizona in the early 1890's. As a strong Democrat, he took a serious interest in civic affairs and was elected to the Arizona Senate and supported the prosperity and welfare of his community. Campbell Mesa is now a popular destination for mountain biking, equestrian use and hiking. This view of a snow covered rock formation was photographed on Campbell Mesa in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Rocky Mountain Iris (Iris missouriensis) is easily identified because it is the only iris species growing east of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountain ranges. It blooms May to July in streambanks, meadows, woodland margins generally in moist locations, from near sea level to 11,000 feet elevation. Most of the plants have a pale lavender colored flower but this flower was white. This iris was found by the Arizona Trail on Hart Prairie in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Common Sunflower (Helianthus annus), a wild native of the American Southwest, is a member of the Asteraceae family. It has a well-known characteristic, called heliotropism, of pivoting its leaves and buds to track the path of the sun from sunrise to sunset. Once the flowers open, they are oriented to the east to greet the rising sun. The common sunflower thrives in the dry, brown disturbed soils of the southwest, turning the arid landscape into a shimmering yellow carpet that attracts wildlife, insects and human visitors alike. In Northern Arizona, the Navajo ancestors extracted a dark red dye from the outer seed coats and the Hopi cultivated a purple sunflower to make a special dye. The sunflower seed was an important food source for most North American tribes. The sunflower, with its large yellow flowers, is also an iconic art symbol and the state flower of Kansas. After the Summer Monsoon rains bring moisture to the region, sunflowers bloom in fields all over Northern Arizona. This field of sunflowers with Mount Elden in the background was photographed at Campbell Meadows in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Canyon Diablo (Navajo: Kin Łigaaí) is an 80-mile-long canyon in Northern Arizona. It is part of the 767,000-acre Canyon Diablo Watershed and is made up primarily of private, state trust, federal land and part of the Navajo Nation. In December 1853, U.S. Army Lieutenant Amiel Weeks Whipple was surveying in the area when he found the steep canyon. He named it Canyon Diablo, Spanish for Devil’s Canyon. This view of Canyon Diablo was photographed from the historic Route 66 bridge in Two Guns near Winslow, Arizona, USA.

The Golden Crownbeard (Verbesina encelioides) is a member of the Asteraceae family and is related to the sunflower. It is also called American Dogweed, Butter Daisy, Cowpen Daisy, Crown-beard, Gold Weed, Wild Sunflower and South African Daisy. It is native to the southwest desert and mountains up to 8,000 feet elevation where it grows in open meadows and forest patches. The golden crownbeard is annual and also perennial from a taproot. It grows 2 to 3 feet tall with numerous yellow flower heads. The leaves are green and arrow-shaped with a serrated edge. The blooming plant has a pungent odor. The flowering season is April through November. This meadow of golden crownbeard was photographed at Walnut Canyon Lakes near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Fisher Point is a large and beautifully colored formation of Coconino Sandstone at the western end of Walnut Canyon and the northern end of Sandy’s Canyon. Fisher Point is named for Ed Fisher, an early forest ranger. Fisher Point is located next to the Arizona Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these is Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the peaks was taken from the O'Leary Peak Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Flagstaff is surrounded by the 1.8 million-acre Coconino National Forest, one of the largest national forests in the country. This national forest has a diversity of habitat ranging from desert to mountain peaks. It is also home to the largest contiguous Ponderosa Pine forest in North America. Interspersed among the pines are vast meadows of grasses and seasonal wildflowers. This grassy meadow ringed by Ponderosa Pines was photographed from the Sunset Trail located in the Mount Elden Dry Lake Hills north of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a year-round resident of North America and the Hawaiian Islands. Male coloration varies in intensity with availability of the berries and fruits in its diet. As a result, the colors range from pale straw-yellow through bright orange to deep red. Adult females have brown upperparts and streaked underparts. This male finch was photographed at Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos) is a species of lizard native to western North America. They are often called "horny toads", although they are not actually in the same family as toads. Desert horned lizards are distinguished by the large pointed scales at the back of their heads, giving them the appearance of having horns as well as the flat and broad shape of their bodies. This horned lizard was photographed on Campbell Mesa in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Blue Heron Standing on a Rock The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands.  It is the largest of the heron family native to North America.  Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight.  The face and head are white with black stripes.  The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow.  The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America.  East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water.  The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food.  The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds.  Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight.  Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to.  The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole.  The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands.  They build their large nests high up in the trees.  This heron was photographed while standing on a rock by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden flagstaff stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Blue Heron Standing on a Rock The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while standing on a rock by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden flagstaff stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while standing on a rock by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Sixty million years ago the west side of Bright Angel Fault was lifted higher than the east side, creating the canyon that we now see. The exposed walls of Bright Angel Canyon allow us to see the geological history of the area. Tropical seas, coastal beaches, sand dunes, swamps, lagoons, and Sahara-like deserts are represented by the horizontal layers that are exposed. The upper five layers of stacked rock records 70 million years of rising and falling sea levels. The limestone layers represent shallow sea environments, sandstone layers mean sandy beaches or dunes, while shale layers translate to mud flats, swamps, or coastal plains. This picture of Bright Angel Canyon was taken at sunrise from Bright Angel Point on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA.

Sunset Crater is one of nearly 600 volcanoes in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. It is the youngest volcano in the area, forming around 1,000 years ago. This 1,000-foot-high cinder cone formed when basalt magma rose directly to the surface through a primary vent. Gas pressure in the volcano produced a fountain of lava about 850 feet high. The lava was blown into pieces, which cooled in flight and piled into a cone-shaped hill. Sunset Crater was a short-lived volcano, lasting only months or a couple of years at the most. When famed explorer John Wesley Powell explored the San Francisco Volcanic Field in 1885 he wrote, "The contrast in the colors is so great that on viewing the mountain from a distance the red cinders seem to be on fire." His "Sunset" mountain became known officially as Sunset Crater. This view of Sunset Crater was photographed from Bonito Park, next to Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are actually the remnants of an ancient volcano. Millions of years ago a large mountain was shattered by a powerful explosion which left a large crater and surrounding peaks. Inside the now quiet caldera, known as the Inner Basin, a lush alpine environment has blurred evidence of that cataclysmic event. Here, extensive stands of aspens cover the steep slopes of the old caldera, coloring them solid gold in early fall. The Inner Basin is in Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) is a rabbit native to the American southwest from western Texas north to eastern Montana, and in northern and central Mexico. The cottontail gets its name from the grayish-brown tufted tail. The desert cottontail’s diet consists mainly of forbs and grasses. It can also eat many other plants including cacti. They can be seen foraging for their food in the early morning and evening. Since they get most of their water from plants or dew, they rarely need to drink. On windy days they remain in their burrows because the wind interferes with their ability to hear predators. Cottontails use burrows created by other mammals to give birth to their young. This desert cottontail was photographed near Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are actually the remnants of an ancient volcano. Millions of years ago a large mountain was shattered by a powerful explosion which left a large crater and surrounding peaks. Inside the now quiet caldera, known as the Inner Basin, a lush alpine environment has blurred evidence of that cataclysmic event. Here, extensive stands of aspens cover the steep slopes of the old caldera, coloring them solid gold in early fall. The Inner Basin is in Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Blue Heron Hunting by the Water The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden flagstaff stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Blue Heron Hunting by the Water The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden flagstaff stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus) may be the most familiar North American butterfly. They range from southern Canada to South America. Adults make massive migrations from August to October, flying thousands of miles south to hibernate along the California coast and Central Mexico. Their favorite nectar sources include the Asters, Coneflowers and Milkweeds. This butterfly was photographed while perched on a Purple Coneflower in the Flagstaff, Arizona, USA arboretum.

Nearly a thousand years ago natives inhabited the lower elevations around the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Today the remnants of their villages dot the landscape along with their other artifacts. These petroglyphs were found on Magnetic Mesa in Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), with its distinctive orange throat and blue eyes, is a seabird whose habitat includes rivers and lakes as well as in coastal areas. It is widely distributed across North America, from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska down to Florida and Mexico. This male cormorant was photographed standing with his wings spread on the bank of Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Red-Winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) is a songbird of the family Icteridae found in most of North America and in parts of Central America. The red-winged blackbird is sexually dimorphic, meaning that the males and females look distinctively different from each other. The male is dark black with a red shoulder and yellow wing bar. The female is a mottled brown. The diet of the red-winged blackbird consists of seeds and insects. Seeds and insects make up the bulk of the red-winged blackbird's diet. The red-winged blackbird inhabits freshwater and saltwater marshes as well as open grassy areas. It generally prefers wetlands, especially if cattail is present. This male red-winged blackbird was photographed while perched on a cattail at Kachina Wetland in Kachina Village near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos) is a species of lizard native to western North America. They are often called "horny toads", although they are not actually in the same family as toads. Desert horned lizards are distinguished by the large pointed scales at the back of their heads, giving them the appearance of having horns as well as the flat and broad shape of their bodies. This horned lizard was photographed at Picture Canyon Natural and Cultural Preserve in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Grand Canyon is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River. It is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and attains a depth of over a mile. The canyon and adjacent north and south rims are contained within Grand Canyon National Park, the Kaibab National Forest, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, the Hualapai Indian Reservation, the Havasupai Indian Reservation and the Navajo Nation. In the Grand Canyon the carving of the Colorado River has exposed nearly two billion years of the earth's geological history and created some stunning scenery. This scene was photographed from the South Kaibab Trail in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA.

Aspen groves are unique ecosystems characterized by a remarkable ability to reproduce vegetatively, leading to the formation of what appears to be a single organism known as a clonal colony. Aspen trees (Populus tremuloides) primarily reproduce through a process called suckering. The grove starts from a single seedling, but over time, new shoots (suckers) emerge from the root system, creating genetically identical trees. These interconnected trees form a clonal colony, often considered the largest living organism on Earth. The trees within an aspen grove are connected by a common root system. This interconnected root network allows the trees to share resources such as water and nutrients. It also enables them to communicate with each other, making the grove function as a unified entity. This aspen grove on a hillside was photographed in the Coconino National Forest north of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) is a large diving duck that lives in rivers, lakes and saltwater in the forested areas of Europe, northern and central Asia, and North America. It has a serrated bill that helps it grip its prey which are mostly fish. In addition, it eats mollusks, crustaceans, worms and larvae. The common merganser builds its nest in tree cavities. The species is a permanent resident where the waters remain open in winter and migrates away from areas where the water freezes. This female common merganser in non-breeding plumage was photographed while standing on the bank of Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli) is a small songbird in the tit family Paridae. Adults have a black cap joining a black stripe behind the eyes and distinctive white eyebrows. Their backs and flanks are gray with gray underparts. They have a short black bill and a black bib. The mountain chickadee inhabitants the mountainous regions of the western United States, ranging from the southern Yukon to California and the Rocky Mountain States. They are monogamous and produce 1 to 2 broods per year. The young stay in the nest for 21 days and are fed by both parents. During the summer and breeding season their primary diet is insects. Conifer and other seeds are part of the diet throughout the year. The call of the mountain chickadee is a noisy chick-adee-dee-dee. This chickadee was photographed while perching on a branch near Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Fisher Point is a large and beautifully colored formation of Coconino Sandstone at the western end of Walnut Canyon and the northern end of Sandy’s Canyon. Fisher Point is named for Ed Fisher, an early forest ranger. Fisher Point is located next to the Arizona Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these is Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the peaks was taken from the O'Leary Peak Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Lomaki Pueblo, meaning the "Beautiful House", is located on Antelope Prairie in the plains between the Painted Desert and the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. Nearly a thousand years ago natives inhabited this area which is so dry and windy it would seem impossible to live. It was here that they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. Here, there is no evidence of nearby streams that could have been used for irrigation. All of the farming depended on rainfall. Today the remnants of their villages dot the landscape. Wupatki National Monument was established in 1924 to preserve this cultural heritage. The monument is located off US Highway 89 near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The North American Porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) is the second largest rodent in North America, after the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis). The porcupine is distinguished by its coat of about 30,000 quills that covers all of its body except underbelly, face and feet. The quills are sharp, barbed and hollow hairs that are used primarily for defense and insulation. When used for defense, the quills can lodge in the flesh of a victim and are difficult and painful to remove. The porcupine’s summer diet includes twigs, roots, stems, berries, and other vegetation. In the winter, they mainly eat conifer needles and tree bark. Porcupines are a slow-moving creature with poor distance vision. They are nocturnal, spending their days resting in trees. The porcupine does not hibernate in winter, preferring to stay close and sleep in their dens. This porcupine was photographed in the woods near Williams, Arizona, USA.

A thousand or more years ago, natives inhabited the lower elevations around the San Francisco Peaks of Northern Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops, hunted game and raised families. Today the remnants of their villages dot the landscape along with other artifacts such as this obsidian projectile point from the Sinaguan era; about 500AD to 1450AD. Although commonly called an arrowhead, the point was probably not attached to an arrow or shot from a bow, a weapon not thought to be used by the Sinagua. More likely it was affixed to the tip of a spear and thrown to strike and kill game animals. It is unlawful to remove artifacts, such as this point, from a native site. They may be examined but must be returned to their original location. This projectile point was photographed at Sandy Seep in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The American Wigeon (Mareca americana), also called a baldpate, is a medium sized dabbling duck found in North America. The breeding male, or drake, has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream-colored stripe running from the top of its head to its bill. The hens are much less distinctive with gray and brown plumage. Both males and females have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet. It nests on the ground, under cover and near water, laying 6–12 creamy white eggs. The American Wigeon is migratory, breeding in all of North America except the extreme far north. Wintering areas include the Central Valley of California, Washington’s Puget Sound, the Texas Panhandle and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. This male American Wigeon was photographed while walking on ice at Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Rock Squirrel (Spermophilus variegatus) is fairly large ground squirrel but can also be seen climbing boulders, rocks and trees. It is typically 17-21 inches long, with a bushy tail up to 8 inches long. Rock squirrels are grayish-brown, with some patches of cinnamon color. They have a light-colored ring around their eyes and pointed ears that project well above their heads. In the northern reach of their habitat, rock squirrels hibernate during the colder months of the year. In southern areas, rock squirrels may not hibernate at all. The diet of the rock squirrel is predominantly herbivorous, consisting mostly of leaves, stems and seeds. They may also eat some insects and other small animals. Because of high human visitation, rock squirrels have become the most dangerous animals at the national parks of the American Southwest. Rock squirrels attack more tourists at the Grand Canyon than any other wild animal. Attacks have become so common that park rangers have begun warning tourists about the dangers. This rock squirrel was photographed at Yavapai Point in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA.

The Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) is a large diving duck that lives in rivers, lakes and saltwater in the forested areas of Europe, northern and central Asia, and North America. It has a serrated bill that helps it grip its prey which are mostly fish. In addition, it eats mollusks, crustaceans, worms and larvae. The common merganser builds its nest in tree cavities. The species is a permanent resident where the waters remain open in winter and migrates away from areas where the water freezes. This female common merganser in non-breeding plumage was photographed while swimming at Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

of 46
Next

© 2024 iStockphoto LP. The iStock design is a trademark of iStockphoto LP. Browse millions of high-quality stock photos, illustrations, and videos.