Jeff Goulden Mojave Desert Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

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Many people identify the typical desert as a vast area covered by sand dunes. That may be true in some parts of the world but in the Mojave, less than one percent of the desert is covered with sand dunes. In order for sand dunes to exist there has to be a source of sand. Also there needs to be winds to move the sands and a place for the sand to collect. The eroded canyons and washes of Death Valley National Park in California provide plenty of sand. The wind seems to blow frequently here, especially in the springtime, and there are a few areas where the sand is trapped by geographic features such as mountains. Mesquite Flats near Stovepipe Wells is one such place. This sunset picture of the sand dunes and the Grapevine Mountains was taken after a winter storm had passed.

Water is a scarce resource in the desert Southwest. In the early 1900's cattle ranchers, needing a natural water source, built a catch basin in this high desert area of California to capture rainfall and runoff. Later, a dam was built here by the Barker and Shay Cattle Company to expand the reservoir. Because of insufficient rainfall in the area, cattle ranching was a short lived enterprise. Today, Barker Reservoir in Joshua National Park, California is a quiet oasis, providing water and shelter for desert animals and migrating birds.

Zion Canyon and the Meandering Virgin River at Dusk Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Zion Canyon and the Meandering Virgin River at Dusk Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA.

Boundary Cone Butte, elevation 3429, is a volcanic neck in the foothills of the Black Mountains of Mohave County, Arizona, USA. The butte is on the historic Route 66 near Oatman, Arizona, about 14 miles east of the Colorado River. Boundary Cone was a prominent landmark to pioneers traveling through the area. The butte is also an important religious and cultural symbol to native tribes in the area. In the early Spring, the meadows surrounding the butte are filled with the colorful orange California Poppy.

Capitol Reef National Park is in the desert of southern Utah. The park is filled with cliffs, towers, domes and arches. The first part of the park’s name derives from the many dome shaped Navajo Sandstone formations each of which resembles the US capitol. The second half of the name refers to the parallel impassable ridges which the early settlers called reefs. The first paved road through this area wasn’t constructed until 1962. Central to the area is the famous Waterpocket Fold, a 100-mile wrinkle in the earth, which is 65 million years old and the largest exposed monocline in North America. The Fremont River has carved canyons through some parts of the Waterpocket Fold but the area remains a dry desert. The park is also a showcase for ancient history and the more recent history of the Mormon pioneers. This scene of ancient petroglyphs was photographed in Capitol Reef National Park near Fruita, Utah, USA.

Landscape Arch is a 306 foot span of sandstone that has slowly been eroding away for centuries. On September 1, 1991 a 60 foot long slab of the rock peeled away, leaving 180 tons of rock debris below the arch. Landscape Arch is in the Devil's Garden area of Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

Sitgreaves Pass, at 3586 feet above sea level, is where the historic Beale's Wagon Road crossed the Black Mountains of Mohave County, Arizona, USA. When Edward Fitzgerald Beale built his wagon road over the pass, he named it John Howells Pass for one of the men in his expedition of October, 1857. Subsequently, the pass was named for Captain Lorenzo Sitgreaves who led the 1851 Expedition Down the Zuni and Colorado Rivers. Years later the pass was used for the famous Route 66 between Los Angeles and Chicago. The narrow two lane highway is still in use today. In the early spring, the area around Sitgreaves Pass is dominated by wild California Poppies which fill the meadows with a dense carpet of orange.

The Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family that typically grows in the Mojave Desert of the American Southwest. Legend has it that Mormon pioneers named the tree after the biblical figure Joshua, seeing the limbs of the tree as outstretched arms. This Joshua Tree was photographed at the Jumbo Rocks area in Joshua Tree National Park, California.

Sitgreaves Pass, at 3586 feet above sea level, is where the historic Beale's Wagon Road crossed the Black Mountains of Mohave County, Arizona, USA. When Edward Fitzgerald Beale built his wagon road over the pass, he named it John Howells Pass for one of the men in his expedition of October, 1857. Subsequently, the pass was named for Captain Lorenzo Sitgreaves who led the 1851 Expedition Down the Zuni and Colorado Rivers. Years later the pass was used for the famous Route 66 between Los Angeles and Chicago. The narrow two lane highway is still in use today. In the early spring, the area around Sitgreaves Pass is dominated by wild California Poppies which fill the meadows with a dense carpet of orange.

The strange looking Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family that typically grows in the Mojave Desert. Legend has it that Mormon pioneers named the tree after the biblical figure Joshua, seeing the limbs of the tree as outstretched arms. The Joshua Tree doesn't bloom every year which may have something to do with the amount of rainfall received. This Joshua Tree blossom was photographed at the Split Rock area in Joshua Tree National Park, California.

Monument Valley, on the Arizona - Utah border, gives us some of the most iconic and enduring images of the American Southwest. The harsh empty desert is punctuated by many colorful sandstone rock formations. It can be a photographer's dream to capture the ever-changing play of light on the buttes and mesas. Even to the first-time visitor, Monument Valley will probably seem very familiar. This rugged landscape has achieved fame in the movies, advertising and brochures. It has been filmed and photographed countless times over the years. If a movie producer was looking for a landscape that epitomizes the Old West, a better location could not be found. This picture of Mitchell Butte in the evening light was photographed from the Monument Valley Road north of Kayenta, Arizona, USA.

Pronghorn Antelope Looking at the Camera The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is a species of artiodactyl (even-toed, hoofed) mammal native to interior western and central North America. Although it is commonly thought of and called an antelope it is not a true antelope.  The pronghorn is the only surviving member of the Antilocapridae family and has been in North America for over a million years. The pronghorn has a similar body shape to a deer but stockier and shorter legged.  Both males and females grow horns but the male horns are larger.  The horns are shed each year as the new horns grow from underneath.  The pronghorn weighs between 90 and 120 pounds and stands about 3 1/2 feet tall at the shoulder.  It has a tan to reddish brown body with white markings throughout.  The pronghorn is the fastest land mammal in the Western Hemisphere.  Its great speed enables the pronghorn to outrun most predators.  Pronghorns are migratory herd animals.  Their migration routes have been threatened by fencing and fragmentation of their habitat.  Pronghorns cannot jump over traditional barb wire fences like deer and elk can.  They try to pass underneath and sometimes get caught in the fencing.  Newer types of fencing have plastic pipe under the bottom strands which allows the animals to pass through.  Pronghorns are quite numerous and in some areas like Wyoming and northern Colorado the pronghorn population at times has exceeded the human population.  This pronghorn was photographed at Bryce Point Turnoff in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Pronghorn Antelope Looking at the Camera The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is a species of artiodactyl (even-toed, hoofed) mammal native to interior western and central North America. Although it is commonly thought of and called an antelope it is not a true antelope. The pronghorn is the only surviving member of the Antilocapridae family and has been in North America for over a million years. The pronghorn has a similar body shape to a deer but stockier and shorter legged. Both males and females grow horns but the male horns are larger. The horns are shed each year as the new horns grow from underneath. The pronghorn weighs between 90 and 120 pounds and stands about 3 1/2 feet tall at the shoulder. It has a tan to reddish brown body with white markings throughout. The pronghorn is the fastest land mammal in the Western Hemisphere. Its great speed enables the pronghorn to outrun most predators. Pronghorns are migratory herd animals. Their migration routes have been threatened by fencing and fragmentation of their habitat. Pronghorns cannot jump over traditional barb wire fences like deer and elk can. They try to pass underneath and sometimes get caught in the fencing. Newer types of fencing have plastic pipe under the bottom strands which allows the animals to pass through. Pronghorns are quite numerous and in some areas like Wyoming and northern Colorado the pronghorn population at times has exceeded the human population. This pronghorn was photographed at Bryce Point Turnoff in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is a species of artiodactyl (even-toed, hoofed) mammal native to interior western and central North America. Although it is commonly thought of and called an antelope it is not a true antelope. The pronghorn is the only surviving member of the Antilocapridae family and has been in North America for over a million years. The pronghorn has a similar body shape to a deer but stockier and shorter legged. Both males and females grow horns but the male horns are larger. The horns are shed each year as the new horns grow from underneath. The pronghorn weighs between 90 and 120 pounds and stands about 3 1/2 feet tall at the shoulder. It has a tan to reddish brown body with white markings throughout. The pronghorn is the fastest land mammal in the Western Hemisphere. Its great speed enables the pronghorn to outrun most predators. Pronghorns are migratory herd animals. Their migration routes have been threatened by fencing and fragmentation of their habitat. Pronghorns cannot jump over traditional barb wire fences like deer and elk can. They try to pass underneath and sometimes get caught in the fencing. Newer types of fencing have plastic pipe under the bottom strands which allows the animals to pass through. Pronghorns are quite numerous and in some areas like Wyoming and northern Colorado the pronghorn population at times has exceeded the human population. This pronghorn was photographed at Bryce Point Turnoff in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, USA.

Monument Valley, on the Arizona - Utah border, gives us some of the most iconic and enduring images of the American Southwest. The harsh empty desert is punctuated by many colorful sandstone rock formations. It can be a photographer's dream to capture the ever-changing play of light on the buttes and mesas. Even to the first-time visitor, Monument Valley will probably seem very familiar. This rugged landscape has achieved fame in the movies, advertising and brochures. It has been filmed and photographed countless times over the years. If a movie producer was looking for a landscape that epitomizes the Old West, a better location could not be found. This picture of Mitchell Butte with a shack at the end of a rainbow was photographed from the Monument Valley Road north of Kayenta, Arizona, USA.

The Valley of Fire is a 46,000-acre State Park, famous for its unique rock formations, red sandstone cliffs, and petroglyphs. Rainbow Vista is a viewpoint that offers breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape, with vibrant colors ranging from reds and oranges to yellows and pinks. The unique sandstone formations have been eroded by wind and water over millions of years, creating a variety of interesting shapes and textures. On May 20, 2012 there was an annular solar eclipse that was visible from the Valley of Fire. The sun formed a ring around the moon; a spectacular phenomenon to view. As the sun passed behind the moon, the land around the area acquired an other-worldly glow, providing the opportunity to capture some brightly colored and radiant scenes. This scene was photographed at the Rainbow Vista in Valley of Fire State Park, near Overton, Nevada, USA.

Much of the American West is punctuated by a series of alternating and parallel north and south mountain ranges with broad valleys between. Geologists call this the Basin and Range Geological Province. The basin and range topography tells the story of the earth's crust stretching from east to west and cracking along north south lines. The mountain ranges are the result of uplifting forces while the valleys are formed when the landscape drops. Panamint Valley in Death Valley National Park, California, USA is an example of the mountains wearing away and at the same time filling the valley floor with sediment.

Towers of the Virgin at Dawn Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Towers of the Virgin was photographed from the Zion Human History Museum in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Towers of the Virgin at Dawn Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Towers of the Virgin was photographed from the Zion Human History Museum in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Towers of the Virgin was photographed from the Zion Human History Museum in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA.

Many people identify the typical desert as a vast area covered by sand dunes. That may be true in some parts of the world but in the Mojave, less than one percent of the desert is covered with sand dunes. In order for sand dunes to exist there has to be a source of sand. Also there needs to be winds to move the sands and a place for the sand to collect. The eroded canyons and washes of Death Valley National Park in California provide plenty of sand. The wind seems to blow frequently here, especially in the springtime, and there are a few areas where the sand is trapped by geographic features such as mountains. Mesquite Flats near Stovepipe Wells is one such place. This sunset picture of the sand dunes and the Grapevine Mountains was taken after a winter storm had passed.

Badwater Basin is the lowest point in North America at 282 feet below sea level. Periodic rainstorms flood the valley floor but soon evaporate because of the intense heat, leaving behind a pattern of crystals on the salt pan. Average annual rainfall in Badwater Basin is 1.9 inches a year. According to legend, Badwater gets its name from a mule that refused to drink the salty water. Badwater Basin is in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest state park. The park gets its name from the red rock formations which appear to be on fire as the sun sets. These Aztec sandstone rocks were formed from sand dunes 150 million years ago. The region was further shaped by uplifting and faulting followed by extensive erosion. The Anasazi people visited this area from about 300 BC to 1150 AD. Scarcity of water would have prevented their living here but they probably hunted, gathered food and performed religious ceremonies. There are several sites where their petroglyphs can still be seen. In 1931, 8,760 acres of federal land was transferred to the state of Nevada. In 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began developing the park which opened in 1934. The CCC continued working on the park into the early 1940’s and built campgrounds, trails, visitor cabins, ramadas and roads. In 1935, the Nevada State Legislature designated the area as Valley of Fire State Park. In 1968, the park was recognized as a National Natural Landmark. This scene of red rock formations was photographed at Petroglyph Canyon. Valley of Fire State Park is located 50 miles northeast of Las Vegas near Overton, Nevada, USA.

Water shapes the landscape of the Colorado Plateau more than any other force. Rain erodes the sandstone and carries sediment down washes and canyons to the Colorado River. The sandstone forms rock fins that stick out of the surrounding landscape. A fin is a geologic formation that is a narrow, residual wall of hard sedimentary rock that remains standing after surrounding rock has been eroded away along parallel joints or fractures. Eventually the fins can become arches. The sheer walls, fins and sandstone monoliths of the Park Avenue Canyon reminded early visitors of buildings lining a big city street. Thus, the name Park Avenue. This scene of the canyon was photographed from the Park Avenue Trail in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

Monument Valley, on the Arizona - Utah border, gives us some of the most iconic and enduring images of the American Southwest. The harsh empty desert is punctuated by many colorful sandstone rock formations. It can be a photographer's dream to capture the ever-changing play of light on the buttes and mesas. Even to the first-time visitor, Monument Valley will probably seem very familiar. This rugged landscape has achieved fame in the movies, advertising and brochures. It has been filmed and photographed countless times over the years. If a movie producer was looking for a landscape that epitomizes the Old West, a better location could not be found. This picture of Mitchell Butte in the evening light was photographed from the Monument Valley Road north of Kayenta, Arizona, USA.

Point of Rocks Springs is part of an unusual and extensive wetland region at the southern end of the Amargosa Valley. This is a very hot and dry area near the north edge of the Mojave Desert. These many springs are home to the endangered Desert Hole Pupfish. Point of Rocks Springs is in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge near Pahrump, Nevada, USA.

Gower Gulch is a one and a half mile canyon near Zabriskie Point on the eastern side of Death Valley in the Black Mountains. The Gower Gulch trail goes through some classic examples of badlands formations. Gower Gulch is named after Harry P. Gower, an official of the Pacific Coast Borax Company. The gulch contained mines, camps, and roads during the late 19th century and early 20th century. Gower Gulch is located in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

Grotto at the Base of a Cliff Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Riverside Walk Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Grotto at the Base of a Cliff Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Riverside Walk Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Riverside Walk Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA.

Rainbow Canyon, also named Star Wars Canyon, is a narrow canyon in eastern California. It is commonly used by the United States military for fighter jet training. It is also frequented by spectators who are able to photograph the jets flying beneath the canyon rim and out into Panamint Valley. Rainbow Canyon was photographed from Father Crowley Overlook in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

One of the most striking features of the Mojave Desert in the American Southwest are the pillowy shaped rock formations and the strange looking plants that surround them. Heat and pressure over thousands of years transformed sedimentary rock into an entirely new kind of rock called gneiss. These gneiss formations surrounded by yucca were photographed at the Live Oak area in Joshua Tree National Park, California.

Natural Bridge Canyon is one of many old streambeds that have formed canyons. In this canyon you can find a dry waterfall and a natural bridge that spans the walls of the canyon. Natural Bridge Canyon is near the Badwater Road in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

Zion Mount Carmel Highway Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Zion Mount Carmel Highway was photographed from the Canyon Overlook Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Zion Mount Carmel Highway Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Zion Mount Carmel Highway was photographed from the Canyon Overlook Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Zion Mount Carmel Highway was photographed from the Canyon Overlook Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA.

Devil's Garden is an area of uncommon beauty featuring natural sandstone arches, walls and rock fins. The rock fin in the center right of this picture appears to be shaped like a dinosaur roaming between the other rock formations. Devil's Garden is in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

Badwater Basin is the lowest point in North America at 282 feet below sea level. Periodic rainstorms flood the valley floor but soon evaporate because of the intense heat, leaving behind a pattern of crystals on the salt pan. Average annual rainfall in Badwater Basin is 1.9 inches a year. According to legend, Badwater gets its name from a mule that refused to drink the salty water. This view of Badwater Basin is from Dante's View at 5,476 feet above sea level. Dante's View is about 16 miles south of Furnace Creek in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

The Valley of Fire is a 46,000-acre State Park, famous for its unique rock formations, red sandstone cliffs, and petroglyphs. The White Domes are a set of sandstone formations that contrast with the surrounding red rocks. These rock formations were formed by ancient sand dunes that were compressed and cemented together over time. The white sandstone is softer than the red sandstone and has eroded away over millions of years to form the unique domes. The White Domes are famous for their use in filming television shows such as Star Trek: Generations, Transformers and The Professionals. On May 20, 2012 there was an annular solar eclipse that was visible from the Valley of Fire. The sun formed a ring around the moon; a spectacular phenomenon to view. As the sun passed behind the moon, the land around the area acquired an other-worldly glow, providing the opportunity to capture some brightly colored and radiant scenes. This scene was photographed at the White Domes in Valley of Fire State Park, near Overton, Nevada, USA.

Zion Canyon and the Meandering Virgin River at Dusk Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Virgin River and Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Zion Canyon and the Meandering Virgin River at Dusk Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Virgin River and Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden mojave desert stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the Virgin River and Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA.

Borax deposits were first discovered in Death Valley in 1881. This lead way to large scale borax mining in the area. From 1883 to 1889, the Harmony Borax Works became famous through the use of large twenty-mule team double wagons which hauled borax over the 170 mile route to the closest railroad in Mojave, California. The Harmony Borax Works was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 31, 1974. Harmony Borax Works is in Death Valley National Park near Furnace Creek, California, USA.

Hoodoos start with an initial deposition of rock. Then over time the rock is uplifted then eroded and weathered. Hoodoos typically consist of relatively soft rock topped by harder, less easily eroded stone that protects each column from the weather. Hoodoos generally form within sedimentary rock such as sandstone. These hoodoos were photographed from The Rock Pinnacles in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

Water is a scarce resource in the desert Southwest. In the early 1900's cattle ranchers, needing a natural water source, built a catch basin in this high desert area of California to capture rainfall and runoff. Later, a dam was built here by the Barker and Shay Cattle Company to expand the reservoir. Because of insufficient rainfall in the area, cattle ranching was a short lived enterprise. Today, Barker Reservoir in Joshua National Park, California is a quiet oasis, providing water and shelter for desert animals and migrating birds.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

Water shapes the landscape of the Colorado Plateau more than any other force. Rain erodes the sandstone and carries sediment down washes and canyons to the Colorado River. The sandstone forms rock fins that stick out of the surrounding landscape. A fin is a geologic formation that is a narrow, residual wall of hard sedimentary rock that remains standing after surrounding rock has been eroded away along parallel joints or fractures. Eventually the fins can become arches. These fins, because of their shapes, were named Sheep Rock and Courthouse Towers. They are located at the bottom of Park Avenue in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

The Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family that typically grows in the Mojave Desert of the American Southwest. Legend has it that Mormon pioneers named the tree after the biblical figure Joshua, seeing the limbs of the tree as outstretched arms. This Joshua Tree was photographed in the Mormon Mountain Wilderness near Riverside, Nevada, USA.

Water shapes the landscape of the Colorado Plateau more than any other force. Rain erodes the sandstone and carries sediment down washes and canyons to the Colorado River. The forces of erosion shape more than just the many fins and arches. Balanced Rock is an example of the various layers of rock that seem to defy gravity. The top boulder is hard Entrada Sandstone perched on a pedestal of mudstone. The overall height of Balanced Rock is 128 feet and the boulder alone weighs 3500 tons. Eventually erosion and gravity will cause this delicate formation to collapse. Balanced Rock is in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

The colorful landscape seen at Zabriskie Point extends several miles to the southeast. These spectacular multi-colored "badlands" formations may be viewed close up in Twenty Mule Team Canyon, a dry wash that winds through the undulating hills. The eroded formations have greatly contrasting colors - black or dark brown to the west, cream, yellow and white to the east. Zabriskie Point and Twenty Mule Team Canyon are in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

The colorful landscape seen at Zabriskie Point extends several miles to the southeast. These spectacular multi-colored "badlands" formations may be viewed close up in Twenty Mule Team Canyon, a dry wash that winds through the undulating hills. The eroded formations have greatly contrasting colors - black or dark brown to the west, cream, yellow and white to the east. Zabriskie Point and Twenty Mule Team Canyon are in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

Devils Cornfield is a broad, open area on the bottom of Death Valley. Here, the predominant Arrowweed (Pluchea Sericea) collects wind blown soil around its base. As the soil accumulates, the arrowweed grows high enough to resemble harvested sheaves of corn. Devil's Cornfield is near Stovepipe Wells in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

Fiery Furnace is a maze with long rows of fins and canyons. This is an environment of sheer walls, exposed cliffs and narrow passages. Within this maze there are many rare plants and fragile soils. For these reasons, hiking within the area is either ranger-led or by special permit. Fiery Furnace is in Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

The colorful landscape seen at Zabriskie Point extends several miles to the southeast. These spectacular multi-colored "badlands" formations may be viewed close up in Twenty Mule Team Canyon, a dry wash that winds through the undulating hills. The eroded formations have greatly contrasting colors - black or dark brown to the west, cream, yellow and white to the east. Zabriskie Point and Twenty Mule Team Canyon are in Death Valley National Park, California, USA.

The Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family that typically grows in the Mojave Desert of the American Southwest. Legend has it that Mormon pioneers named the tree after the biblical figure Joshua, seeing the limbs of the tree as outstretched arms. This Joshua Tree was photographed in the Mormon Mountain Wilderness near Riverside, Nevada, USA.

The Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family that typically grows in the Mojave Desert of the American Southwest. Legend has it that Mormon pioneers named the tree after the biblical figure Joshua, seeing the limbs of the tree as outstretched arms. This Joshua Tree was photographed in the Mormon Mountain Wilderness near Riverside, Nevada, USA.

The Colorado River provides some incredible natural vistas along its length. One of the more unusual views is at Horseshoe Bend. The name was inspired by its unusual shape, a horseshoe-shaped meander of the river. Horseshoe Bend, located about four miles southwest of Page, Arizona, USA within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has become a very popular tourist attraction.

Water is a scarce resource in the desert Southwest. In the early 1900's cattle ranchers, needing a natural water source, built a catch basin in this high desert area of California to capture rainfall and runoff. Later, a dam was built here by the Barker and Shay Cattle Company to expand the reservoir. Because of insufficient rainfall in the area, cattle ranching was a short lived enterprise. Today, Barker Reservoir in Joshua National Park, California is a quiet oasis, providing water and shelter for desert animals and migrating birds.

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