Jeff Goulden National Wildlife Refuge Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

Browse 430+ jeff goulden national wildlife refuge stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images.

Most popular

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at Bowerman Basin in the Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge near Hoquiam, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these are Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the snow-capped peaks reflected in a pond was taken from Kachina Wetlands in Kachina Village, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these are Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the snow-capped peaks reflected in a pond was taken from Kachina Wetlands in Kachina Village, Arizona, USA.

The American Pika (Ochotona princeps) is an herbivorous, smaller relative of the rabbit. These cute rodents can be found in the mountains of western North America usually above the tree line in large boulder fields. The pika could become the first mammal in United States to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a result of global climate change. This pika was found near Mount Fremont, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus or Rana catesbeiana) is an amphibious member of the family Ranidae. The bullfrog is native to southern and eastern parts of the United States and Canada, but has been widely introduced across other parts of North, Central and South America, Western Europe, and parts of Asia, and in some areas is regarded as an invasive species. This large frog was found resting among lily pads at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Willapa Bay is the second-largest estuary on the Pacific Coast and home to a vibrant, diverse tideland ecosystem. Willapa Bay was recently designated as a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network of International Importance. Willapa Bay is also home to the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge which includes Long Island. Low tide in Willapa Bay often leaves a pattern in the mud flats. This picture of a saltwater marsh and headland was photographed from Jensen Point on Long Island in the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This photograph was taken at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge near Willows, California, USA.

The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is the second-largest rodent in the world. It is a primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic animal known for creating ponds by building dams. They also build canals and the lodges that they live in. This beaver was photographed while feeding in a pond at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This lone tree with its fall foliage was photographed by a wetland at the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos in Merced County, California.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This lone tree with its fall foliage was photographed by a wetland at the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge near Los Banos in Merced County, California.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Willapa Bay is the second-largest estuary on the Pacific Coast and home to a vibrant, diverse tideland ecosystem. Willapa Bay was recently designated as a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network of International Importance. Willapa Bay is also home to the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge which includes Long Island. Low tide in Willapa Bay often leaves a pattern in the mud flats. This picture of a beach and saltwater marsh was photographed from Diamond Point on Long Island in the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This photograph was taken at the Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge in California, USA.

The Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) is a songbird that is is the only member of the shrike family native to North America. "Loggerhead" refers to the relatively large size of the head as compared to the rest of the body. This shrike was perched in a tree at the Whitewater Draw Wildlife Area near McNeal, Arizona, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The Ruby-Crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) is a small North American songbird. It is among the smallest songbirds on the continent. It has olive-green plumage with a white ring around the eye and white bars on the wing. The male has a red crown patch which is usually concealed, making the male and female identical in appearance. The juvenile kinglet is similar in plumage to the adults. The kinglet is a migratory bird. Its range extends from Alaska and northwest Canada south to Mexico. Its breeding habitat is spruce and fir forests in the mountainous regions of the United States and Canada. The kinglet builds a hanging cup-shaped nest in which it lays up to 12 eggs. Its diet consists mainly of insects but the kinglet also eats fruits and seeds. This female ruby-crowned kinglet was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. The historic twin barns and wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Point of Rocks Springs is part of an unusual and extensive wetland region at the southern end of the Amargosa Valley. This is a very hot and dry area near the north edge of the Mojave Desert. These many springs are home to the endangered Desert Hole Pupfish. Point of Rocks Springs is in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge near Pahrump, Nevada, USA.

The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is the second-largest rodent in the world. It is a primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic animal known for creating ponds by building dams. They also build canals and the lodges that they live in. This beaver was photographed while feeding in a pond at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The American Pika (Ochotona princeps) is an herbivorous, smaller relative of the rabbit. These cute rodents can be found in the mountains of western North America usually above the tree line in large boulder fields. The pika could become the first mammal in United States to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a result of global climate change. This pika was found near Mount Fremont, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Close to the Pacific Ocean and jutting into Grays Harbor, Damon Point has miles of beach walking and is one of the best places in the state to view wildlife. This photograph was taken on a rare sunny and warm day in February. Damon Point is near the town of Ocean Shores, Washington State, USA.

The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is an infrequent visitor to the Pacific Northwest. Rare visitation, known as an irruption is caused by over-population in the owl's native range in the Arctic where they normally winter. This juvenile owl was photographed in early winter at Damon Point near Ocean Shores, Washington State, USA.

The American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) is a small member of the heron family. It is an uncommon resident of the Pacific Northwest and very hard to spot because of their natural camouflage and shy tendencies. This close-up of a bittern was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Willapa Bay is the second-largest estuary on the Pacific Coast and home to a vibrant, diverse tideland ecosystem. Willapa Bay was recently designated as a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network of International Importance. Willapa Bay is also home to the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge which includes Long Island. Low tide in Willapa Bay often leaves a pattern in the mud flats. This picture of a beach and headland was photographed from Jensen Point on Long Island in the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, Washington State, USA.

The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is an infrequent visitor to the Pacific Northwest. Rare visitation, known as an irruption is caused by over-population in the owl's native range in the Arctic where they normally winter. This juvenile owl was photographed in early winter at Damon Point near Ocean Shores, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata) is a dabbling duck that uses its large spatulate bill to feed from the water. Flocks of shovelers often swim in circles with their big bills barely submerged straining food rather than shoveling it as their name implies. This female Northern Shoveler was photographed at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European Robin because of the male's reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related. Robins do not frequent bird feeders because their diet consists of meat and fruit. They are frequently seen tugging earthworms out of the ground. This male robin was photographed while perched in a tree at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Willapa Bay is the second-largest estuary on the Pacific Coast and home to a vibrant, diverse tideland ecosystem. Willapa Bay was recently designated as a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network of International Importance. Willapa Bay is also home to the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge which includes Long Island. Low tide in Willapa Bay often leaves a pattern in the mud flats. This picture was photographed at sunset near Smokey Hollow on Long Island in the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, Washington State, USA.

The American Wigeon (Mareca americana), also called a baldpate, is a medium sized dabbling duck found in North America. The breeding male, or drake, has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream-colored stripe running from the top of its head to its bill. The hens are much less distinctive with gray and brown plumage. Both males and females have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet. It nests on the ground, under cover and near water, laying 6–12 creamy white eggs. The American Wigeon is migratory, breeding in all of North America except the extreme far north. Wintering areas include the Central Valley of California, Washington’s Puget Sound, the Texas Panhandle and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. This American Wigeon male was photographed while swimming in a wetland at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) is the smallest of all the shorebirds. They have a short thin dark bill and greenish legs. Adults are brown with a white belly and dark brown streaks on top. They have a light line above the eye. The least sandpiper breeds in tundra or bogs in northern North America where they nest on the ground close to the water. The female lays four eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass and moss. After leaving the nest, the young birds feed themselves. They are able to fly within two weeks of hatching. The least sandpiper migrates in flocks where they spend the winter in the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and northern South America. Their diet consists of small crustaceans, insects and snails which they pick up by sight or probe for in mudflats. This least sandpiper was photographed while probing for food in the mud at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This field of wild daisies was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The Golden-Crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) is a large sparrow found in the western part of North America. In the breeding season, the golden-crowned sparrow has a broad yellow central stripe on its crown which becomes pale gray towards the back. The golden-crowned sparrow is commonly found on the western side of North America. It is a migratory bird, breeding as far north as Alaska and the Yukon and south to Washington State. It winters from southern Alaska to northern Baja California. The golden-crowned sparrow feeds on the ground, where it forages for seeds, berries, flowers and buds, as well as the occasional insect. This golden-crowned sparrow was photographed while foraging on the ground at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This field of wild daisies was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The Bill Williams River flows into the south end of Lake Havasu near Lake Havasu City. This free flowing river is the only river in Arizona that flows from east to west. The headwaters of the river are 46 miles away at Alamo Lake. This picture of the river and nearby Buckskin mountains was taken in Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge in Arizona, USA.

The Bill Williams River flows into the south end of Lake Havasu near Lake Havasu City. This free flowing river is the only river in Arizona that flows from east to west. The headwaters of the river are 46 miles away at Alamo Lake. This picture of the river and nearby Buckskin mountains was taken in Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge in Arizona, USA.

The Green-Winged Teal (Anas carolinensis) is a common and widespread North American dabbling duck. It breeds in the northern areas of North America and winters in the far south of its breeding range. This is the smallest North American dabbling duck. The breeding male has grey flanks and back and a chestnut head with a green eye patch. The females are light brown, with plumage much like a female mallard. The teal’s habitat is sheltered wetlands where it feeds by dabbling for plants or grazing. They will occasionaly eat mollusks, crustaceans or insects. It nests in depressions on dry ground, under cover and near water. This male green-winged teal was photographed while walking in the mud at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Heron Hunting in the Grass The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting in Puget Sound at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA. jeff goulden national wildlife refuge stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Heron Hunting in the Grass The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting in Puget Sound at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA. jeff goulden national wildlife refuge stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting in Puget Sound at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Heron Hunting in the Grass The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting in Puget Sound at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA. jeff goulden national wildlife refuge stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Heron Hunting in the Grass The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting in Puget Sound at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA. jeff goulden national wildlife refuge stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting in Puget Sound at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Wetlands are an important ecosystem that are permanently or seasonally dominated by water. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other bodies of water is the characteristic presence of aquatic plants adapted to the unique environment. Wetlands play an important role in the environment, including water purification, water storage, processing of carbon and other nutrients and stabilization of shorelines. Wetlands are also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. This wetland was photographed at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The American Wigeon (Mareca americana), also called a baldpate, is a medium sized dabbling duck found in North America. The breeding male, or drake, has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream-colored stripe running from the top of its head to its bill. The hens are much less distinctive with gray and brown plumage. Both males and females have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet. It nests on the ground, under cover and near water, laying 6–12 creamy white eggs. The American Wigeon is migratory, breeding in all of North America except the extreme far north. Wintering areas include the Central Valley of California, Washington’s Puget Sound, the Texas Panhandle and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. This American Wigeon male was photographed while swimming in a wetland at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. It is named after the European Robin because of the male's reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related. Robins do not frequent bird feeders because their diet consists of meat and fruit. They are frequently seen tugging earthworms out of the ground. This male robin was photographed while perched in a tree at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The American Wigeon (Mareca americana), also called a baldpate, is a medium sized dabbling duck found in North America. The breeding male, or drake, has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream-colored stripe running from the top of its head to its bill. The hens are much less distinctive with gray and brown plumage. Both males and females have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet. It nests on the ground, under cover and near water, laying 6–12 creamy white eggs. The American Wigeon is migratory, breeding in all of North America except the extreme far north. Wintering areas include the Central Valley of California, Washington’s Puget Sound, the Texas Panhandle and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. This American Wigeon male was photographed while swimming in a wetland at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

The Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus) is a species of small diving duck. It is a sexually dimorphic species meaning each sex is distinctly different in appearance from the other. Both sexes have a striking appearance and have crests that can be raised or lowered. The adult male in breeding plumage has mainly black and white markings around the head, neck and breast. The adult female has a greyish-brown body, with a narrow white patch over the lower breast and belly. Her crest is reddish-brown and extends from the back of the head. Hooded mergansers migrate short distances and winter where the temperatures allow for ice-free conditions on ponds, lakes and rivers. They have two major year-round ranges. In the eastern US they live from the Canada border along the Atlantic Coast to the Gulf Coast. In the west, they can be found from southern British Columbia to northern Idaho. The hooded merganser likes to live on small bodies of water such as ponds, wetlands and small estuaries. The hooded merganser is a diving predator that largely hunts by sight for fish, insects, crabs and crayfish. This female hooded merganser was photographed while swimming in a wetland at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

of 8
Next

© 2024 iStockphoto LP. The iStock design is a trademark of iStockphoto LP. Browse millions of high-quality stock photos, illustrations, and videos.