Jeff Goulden Petrified Forest National Park Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

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Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs are at the Rainbow Forest in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Between 900AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the Painted Desert east of the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. These ancestral Puebloan people used petrified wood not only for tools but also as a building material. Located on top of a small hill, this structure was built almost entirely of petrified wood and sealed with mud mortar. These thought-provoking remains bring to mind the innovativeness in building and the environmental challenges faced by these indigenous peoples. Based on nearby similar buildings, this pueblo was most likely part of a much larger community of "seasonal farmers or traders". Agate House was partially reconstructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933-34 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 6, 1975. Agate House is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs were photographed at sunset by the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) is a rabbit native to the American southwest from western Texas north to eastern Montana, and in northern and central Mexico. The cottontail gets its name from the grayish-brown tufted tail. The desert cottontail’s diet consists mainly of forbs and grasses. It can also eat many other plants including cacti. They can be seen foraging for their food in the early morning and evening. Since they get most of their water from plants or dew, they rarely need to drink. On windy days they remain in their burrows because the wind interferes with their ability to hear predators. Cottontails use burrows created by other mammals to give birth to their young. This desert cottontail was photographed by the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs were photographed at sunset by the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs are at the Rainbow Forest in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) is a rabbit native to the American southwest from western Texas north to eastern Montana, and in northern and central Mexico. The cottontail gets its name from the grayish-brown tufted tail. The desert cottontail’s diet consists mainly of forbs and grasses. It can also eat many other plants including cacti. They can be seen foraging for their food in the early morning and evening. Since they get most of their water from plants or dew, they rarely need to drink. On windy days they remain in their burrows because the wind interferes with their ability to hear predators. Cottontails use burrows created by other mammals to give birth to their young. This desert cottontail was photographed by the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Painted Desert is an interesting and colorful part of Northern Arizona. It starts south of Holbrook and extends about 120 miles north almost to the Utah border. It encompasses about 7,500 square miles of the Colorado Plateau. The area is made up of colorful mudstone and sandstone known as the Chinle Formation. The rocks of the Chinle Formation were deposited from 227 to 205 million years ago during the Triassic Period. Over the next 180 million years the rocks were buried, uplifted and then eroded into the present-day badland topography. This picture of the Painted Desert was taken from Kachina Point in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs are at the Rainbow Forest in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were photographed at sunset along the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Between 900AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the Painted Desert east of the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. These ancestral Puebloan people used petrified wood not only for tools but also as a building material. Located on top of a small hill, this structure was built almost entirely of petrified wood and sealed with mud mortar. These thought-provoking remains bring to mind the innovativeness in building and the environmental challenges faced by these indigenous peoples. Based on nearby similar buildings, this pueblo was most likely part of a much larger community of "seasonal farmers or traders". Agate House was partially reconstructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933-34 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 6, 1975. Agate House is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Between 900AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the Painted Desert east of the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. These ancestral Puebloan people used petrified wood not only for tools but also as a building material. Located on top of a small hill, this structure was built almost entirely of petrified wood and sealed with mud mortar. These thought-provoking remains bring to mind the innovativeness in building and the environmental challenges faced by these indigenous peoples. Based on nearby similar buildings, this pueblo was most likely part of a much larger community of "seasonal farmers or traders". Agate House was partially reconstructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933-34 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 6, 1975. Agate House is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs were photographed at sunset by the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Between 900AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the Painted Desert east of the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. These ancestral Puebloan people used petrified wood not only for tools but also as a building material. Located on top of a small hill, this structure was built almost entirely of petrified wood and sealed with mud mortar. These thought-provoking remains bring to mind the innovativeness in building and the environmental challenges faced by these indigenous peoples. Based on nearby similar buildings, this pueblo was most likely part of a much larger community of "seasonal farmers or traders". Agate House was partially reconstructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933-34 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 6, 1975. Agate House is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Between 900AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the Painted Desert east of the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. These ancestral Puebloan people used petrified wood not only for tools but also as a building material. Located on top of a small hill, this structure was built almost entirely of petrified wood and sealed with mud mortar. These thought-provoking remains bring to mind the innovativeness in building and the environmental challenges faced by these indigenous peoples. Based on nearby similar buildings, this pueblo was most likely part of a much larger community of "seasonal farmers or traders". Agate House was partially reconstructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933-34 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 6, 1975. Agate House is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Holbrook, Arizona, USA - September 24, 2019: In its almost 100 years overlooking the Painted Desert, the inn has undergone many changes. The original structure, built from petrified wood by Herbert David Lore in the early 1920s was operated as a tourist attraction. Visitors could eat meals and the inn had six small rooms to accommodate overnight guests. In the 1930’s the property was purchased by Petrified Forest National Monument and the building was rebuilt by the Civilian Conservation Corp. In 1940 the inn was reopened for meals, souvenirs and lodging. Once again during World War II the inn was closed. After the war, the inn was taken over and operated by the Fred Harvey Company. The company’s famed architect, Mary Colter, redesigned the building to give it a Southwestern look which is maintained today. The building was registered as a national historic landmark in 1987 and now serves only as a museum with no overnight accommodation and food service. The Painted Desert Inn is located on Kachina Point in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Holbrook, Arizona, USA - September 24, 2019: In its almost 100 years overlooking the Painted Desert, the inn has undergone many changes. The original structure, built from petrified wood by Herbert David Lore in the early 1920s was operated as a tourist attraction. Visitors could eat meals and the inn had six small rooms to accommodate overnight guests. In the 1930’s the property was purchased by Petrified Forest National Monument and the building was rebuilt by the Civilian Conservation Corp. In 1940 the inn was reopened for meals, souvenirs and lodging. Once again during World War II the inn was closed. After the war, the inn was taken over and operated by the Fred Harvey Company. The company’s famed architect, Mary Colter, redesigned the building to give it a Southwestern look which is maintained today. The building was registered as a national historic landmark in 1987 and now serves only as a museum with no overnight accommodation and food service. The Painted Desert Inn is located on Kachina Point in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Painted Desert is an interesting and colorful part of Northern Arizona. It starts south of Holbrook and extends about 120 miles north almost to the Utah border. It encompasses about 7,500 square miles of the Colorado Plateau. The area is made up of colorful mudstone and sandstone known as the Chinle Formation. The rocks of the Chinle Formation were deposited from 227 to 205 million years ago during the Triassic Period. Over the next 180 million years the rocks were buried, uplifted and then eroded into the present-day badland topography. This picture of the Painted Desert was taken from Tiponi Point in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were photographed at sunset along the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were photographed at sunset along the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Painted Desert is an interesting and colorful part of Northern Arizona. It starts south of Holbrook and extends about 120 miles north almost to the Utah border. It encompasses about 7,500 square miles of the Colorado Plateau. The area is made up of colorful mudstone and sandstone known as the Chinle Formation. The rocks of the Chinle Formation were deposited from 227 to 205 million years ago during the Triassic Period. Over the next 180 million years the rocks were buried, uplifted and then eroded into the present-day badland topography. This picture of the Painted Desert was taken from Tiponi Point in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) is a rabbit native to the American southwest from western Texas north to eastern Montana, and in northern and central Mexico. The cottontail gets its name from the grayish-brown tufted tail. The desert cottontail’s diet consists mainly of forbs and grasses. It can also eat many other plants including cacti. They can be seen foraging for their food in the early morning and evening. Since they get most of their water from plants or dew, they rarely need to drink. On windy days they remain in their burrows because the wind interferes with their ability to hear predators. Cottontails use burrows created by other mammals to give birth to their young. This desert cottontail was photographed by the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

The Painted Desert is an interesting and colorful part of Northern Arizona. It starts south of Holbrook and extends about 120 miles north almost to the Utah border. It encompasses about 7,500 square miles of the Colorado Plateau. The area is made up of colorful mudstone and sandstone known as the Chinle Formation. The rocks of the Chinle Formation were deposited from 227 to 205 million years ago during the Triassic Period. Over the next 180 million years the rocks were buried, uplifted and then eroded into the present-day badland topography. This photograph of the Painted Desert was taken from Lacey Point in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were photographed at sunset along the Agate House Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Between 900AD and 1200AD native people inhabited the Painted Desert east of the San Francisco Peaks of Arizona. In an area so dry it would seem impossible to live, they built pueblos, harvested rainwater, grew crops and raised families. Their way of life was the key to survival in this harsh landscape. These people survived here, farming one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau. They developed the skills to farm the land and endure hardship in an area where many would not. These ancestral Puebloan people used petrified wood not only for tools but also as a building material. Located on top of a small hill, this structure was built almost entirely of petrified wood and sealed with mud mortar. These thought-provoking remains bring to mind the innovativeness in building and the environmental challenges faced by these indigenous peoples. Based on nearby similar buildings, this pueblo was most likely part of a much larger community of "seasonal farmers or traders". Agate House was partially reconstructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933-34 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 6, 1975. Agate House is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Petrified wood is formed when dead trees are buried by layers of sediment. The logs soak up groundwater and silica from volcanic ash and over time are crystallized into quartz. Different minerals create the colors seen in the logs. These petrified logs are at the Rainbow Forest in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

About 218 million years ago, flood waters carried fallen trees to this area and created a logjam. Some of these prehistoric trees stood as much as 200 feet tall. After being covered with sediment, the logs petrified over millions of years. Organic matter in the wood was replaced by silica from volcanic ash which then crystallized into quartz. Other minerals provided color to the petrified wood. These petrified logs are at the Long Logs Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

About 218 million years ago, flood waters carried fallen trees to this area and created a logjam. Some of these prehistoric trees stood as much as 200 feet tall. After being covered with sediment, the logs petrified over millions of years. Organic matter in the wood was replaced by silica from volcanic ash which then crystallized into quartz. Other minerals provided color to the petrified wood. These petrified logs are at the Long Logs Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

About 218 million years ago, flood waters carried fallen trees to this area and created a logjam. Some of these prehistoric trees stood as much as 200 feet tall. After being covered with sediment, the logs petrified over millions of years. Organic matter in the wood was replaced by silica from volcanic ash which then crystallized into quartz. Other minerals provided color to the petrified wood. These petrified logs are at the Long Logs Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

About 218 million years ago, flood waters carried fallen trees to this area and created a logjam. Some of these prehistoric trees stood as much as 200 feet tall. After being covered with sediment, the logs petrified over millions of years. Organic matter in the wood was replaced by silica from volcanic ash which then crystallized into quartz. Other minerals provided color to the petrified wood. These petrified logs are at the Long Logs Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

About 218 million years ago, flood waters carried fallen trees to this area and created a logjam. Some of these prehistoric trees stood as much as 200 feet tall. After being covered with sediment, the logs petrified over millions of years. Organic matter in the wood was replaced by silica from volcanic ash which then crystallized into quartz. Other minerals provided color to the petrified wood. These petrified logs are at the Long Logs Trail in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Rusted 1932 Studebaker Historic US Highway 66, known as the “Mother Road”, is more than just a stretch of pavement.  It is also an American icon, a symbol of opportunity, adventure and discovery.  US Highway 66 better known in literature, song, and story as Route 66, was a ribbon of roadway over two thousand miles long that connected Middle America to the Pacific coast.

Beginning in 1926, Route 66 fulfilled different needs in each subsequent decade.  In the 1930’s it was the main travel corridor for migrating families fleeing the Dust Bowl.  In the 1940’s, during World War II, the road was filled with military traffic.  In the 1950’s Route 66 came into its own as motorists took to the road to explore the nation with a freedom never felt before.  In the next decades as the interstate highway system was being developed, drivers bypassed Route 66 in favor of the faster freeways.  Unfortunately, the tourists also bypassed the small towns that gave the Mother Road its character and appeal.

Petrified Forest is the only National Park in the country that contains a section of Historic Route 66.  This stretch of Route 66 was open from 1926 until 1958 and was the primary way millions of travelers accessed the Petrified Forest and Painted Desert.  Near Tiponi Point and the Painted Desert a section of the original roadbed has been preserved along with interpretive signs and a rusty 1932 Studebaker.

The Route 66 interpretive center is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden petrified forest national park stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Rusted 1932 Studebaker Historic US Highway 66, known as the “Mother Road”, is more than just a stretch of pavement. It is also an American icon, a symbol of opportunity, adventure and discovery. US Highway 66 better known in literature, song, and story as Route 66, was a ribbon of roadway over two thousand miles long that connected Middle America to the Pacific coast. Beginning in 1926, Route 66 fulfilled different needs in each subsequent decade. In the 1930’s it was the main travel corridor for migrating families fleeing the Dust Bowl. In the 1940’s, during World War II, the road was filled with military traffic. In the 1950’s Route 66 came into its own as motorists took to the road to explore the nation with a freedom never felt before. In the next decades as the interstate highway system was being developed, drivers bypassed Route 66 in favor of the faster freeways. Unfortunately, the tourists also bypassed the small towns that gave the Mother Road its character and appeal. Petrified Forest is the only National Park in the country that contains a section of Historic Route 66. This stretch of Route 66 was open from 1926 until 1958 and was the primary way millions of travelers accessed the Petrified Forest and Painted Desert. Near Tiponi Point and the Painted Desert a section of the original roadbed has been preserved along with interpretive signs and a rusty 1932 Studebaker. The Route 66 interpretive center is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden petrified forest national park stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Historic US Highway 66, known as the “Mother Road”, is more than just a stretch of pavement. It is also an American icon, a symbol of opportunity, adventure and discovery. US Highway 66 better known in literature, song, and story as Route 66, was a ribbon of roadway over two thousand miles long that connected Middle America to the Pacific coast. Beginning in 1926, Route 66 fulfilled different needs in each subsequent decade. In the 1930’s it was the main travel corridor for migrating families fleeing the Dust Bowl. In the 1940’s, during World War II, the road was filled with military traffic. In the 1950’s Route 66 came into its own as motorists took to the road to explore the nation with a freedom never felt before. In the next decades as the interstate highway system was being developed, drivers bypassed Route 66 in favor of the faster freeways. Unfortunately, the tourists also bypassed the small towns that gave the Mother Road its character and appeal. Petrified Forest is the only National Park in the country that contains a section of Historic Route 66. This stretch of Route 66 was open from 1926 until 1958 and was the primary way millions of travelers accessed the Petrified Forest and Painted Desert. Near Tiponi Point and the Painted Desert a section of the original roadbed has been preserved along with interpretive signs and a rusty 1932 Studebaker. The Route 66 interpretive center is in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

Badlands are a particular type of rock formation found in arid regions around the world. These formations require poorly consolidated rock and infrequent but torrential rain. The soft rock allows large quantities of water to channel down gullies, carrying away sediment. Bentonite clay within these formations can swell up with moisture. As the clay dries it shrinks and cracks, creating a surface resembling the skin of an elephant. Beneath the surface, an intricate maze of natural pipes and spaces form within the badlands. This hidden plumbing appears on the face of the badlands as dimples, sinks, slumps and seeps. As erosion continues, new features including caves and natural bridges can form. Badlands often take on varied colors giving the formations a banded appearance. These colorful badland formations were at Blue Mesa in Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA.

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