Jeff Goulden Washington State Desert Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

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East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This landscape was photographed from the Frog Lake Trail in the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge near Othello, Washington State, USA.

The Central Washington scabland with its basalt formations and arid climate are a sight to behold in the spring. After the snow melts the wildflowers start blooming and carpet the desert-like shrub-steppe environment. This scene of Arrowleaf Balsamroot was photographed in Cowiche Canyon near Yakima, Washington State, USA.

The Hedgehog Cactus (Pediocactus simpsonii) is a low-growing plant native to the scablands of central Washington. This cactus earned its name because it resembles the short, spiny animal of the same name. This hedgehog cactus was photographed at the Beezley Hills Preserve near Quincy, Washington State, USA.

Steamboat Rock is one of the many basaltic rock formations in the Central Washington scablands. The butte rises 800 feet above Banks Lake and was once an island in the Columbia River. This scene was photographed from Steamboat Rock State Park near Grand Coulee, Washington State, USA.

The Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) gets its name from the way the leaves quake in the wind. The aspens grow in large colonies, often starting from a single seedling and spreading underground only to sprout another tree nearby. For this reason, it is considered to be one of the largest single organisms in nature. During the spring and summer, the aspens use sunlight and chlorophyll to create food necessary for the tree’s growth. In the fall, as the days get shorter and colder, the naturally green chlorophyll breaks down and the leaves stop producing food. Other pigments are now visible, causing the leaves to take on beautiful orange and gold colors. These colors can vary from year to year depending on weather conditions. For instance, when autumn is warm and rainy, the leaves are less colorful. This fall scene of gold colored aspens was photographed in Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L.T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area near Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. Frenchman Coulee is a valley leading through the scablands and down to the Columbia River. Volcanic in origin, it is defined by basalt cliffs. Frenchman Coulee is near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

The Pacific Gopher Snake (Pituophis catenifer catenifer) is a large nonvenomous snake native to the Western United States. Their color ranges from yellow to dark brown with gray coloring on the sides and dark brown spots. The adults range in size from 3-7 feet in length. The snake is diurnal most of the time and nocturnal during warm weather. The Pacific gopher snake prefers drier habitats such as meadows and fields. They are seldom seen in dense forests. The Pacific gopher snake is carnivorous and their diet consists of small mammals, lizards, insects, birds and their eggs. This Pacific gopher snake was photographed in the desert at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This landscape was photographed from the Frog Lake Trail in the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge near Othello, Washington State, USA.

Arrowleaf Balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) is a North American flowering plant in the sunflower tribe of the aster family. It is widespread across the western United States and western Canada. It is drought tolerant and grows in diverse habitats from grassland to mountain forest and desert. The plant’s native range extends from British Columbia to the Mojave Desert of California and as far east as the Black Hills of South Dakota. The round to oval shaped leaves are covered in fine hair. The distinctive orange-yellow leaves make the plant easy to identify. These arrowleaf balsamroot were photographed in Cowiche Canyon near Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of the Yakima River was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

Arrowleaf Balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) is a North American flowering plant in the sunflower tribe of the aster family. It is widespread across the western United States and western Canada. It is drought tolerant and grows in diverse habitats from grassland to mountain forest and desert. The plant’s native range extends from British Columbia to the Mojave Desert of California and as far east as the Black Hills of South Dakota. The round to oval shaped leaves are covered in fine hair. The distinctive orange-yellow leaves make the plant easy to identify. These arrowleaf balsamroot were photographed in Cowiche Canyon near Yakima, Washington State, USA.

The scablands of central Washington with their rolling hillsides and basalt canyons offer some of the most colorful landscapes in the state. The Columbia River area has many such side canyons. This scene of the Vantage Bridge from the high bluffs overlooking the river was photographed at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of a desert canyon was photographed from the Cowiche Canyon Trail near Yakima, Washington State, USA.

Arrowleaf Balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) is a North American flowering plant in the sunflower tribe of the aster family. It is widespread across the western United States and western Canada. It is drought tolerant and grows in diverse habitats from grassland to mountain forest and desert. The plant’s native range extends from British Columbia to the Mojave Desert of California and as far east as the Black Hills of South Dakota. The round to oval shaped leaves are covered in fine hair. The distinctive orange-yellow leaves make the plant easy to identify. These arrowleaf balsamroot were photographed in Umtanum Creek Canyon near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

The numerous waterfalls of the Cascade Range and foothills are best viewed in early summer as melting snow feeds the streams, and again in autumn as the rains fill the streambeds. During late summer, only the major waterfalls will be flowing. Only a small number of the many waterfalls in Washington State have been named. Whether the falls have names or not, they are a refreshing sight to both the eye and spirit. Umtanum Falls was photographed on Umtanum Creek near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

The scablands of central Washington with their rolling hillsides and basalt canyons offer some of the most colorful landscapes in the state. The Columbia River area has many such side canyons. This scene of the high bluffs overlooking the river was photographed at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

Arrowleaf Balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) is a North American flowering plant in the sunflower tribe of the aster family. It is widespread across the western United States and western Canada. It is drought tolerant and grows in diverse habitats from grassland to mountain forest and desert. The plant’s native range extends from British Columbia to the Mojave Desert of California and as far east as the Black Hills of South Dakota. The round to oval shaped leaves are covered in fine hair. The distinctive orange-yellow leaves make the plant easy to identify. These arrowleaf balsamroot were photographed in Cowiche Canyon near Yakima, Washington State, USA.

The scablands of central Washington with their rolling hillsides and basalt canyons offer some of the most colorful landscapes in the state. The Columbia River area has many such side canyons. This scene of the Vantage Bridge from the high bluffs overlooking the river was photographed at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

The numerous waterfalls of the Cascade Range and foothills are best viewed in early summer as melting snow feeds the streams, and again in autumn as the rains fill the streambeds. During late summer, only the major waterfalls will be flowing. Only a small number of the many waterfalls in Washington State have been named. Whether the falls have names or not, they are a refreshing sight to both the eye and spirit. Umtanum Falls was photographed on Umtanum Creek near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

The scablands of central Washington with their rolling hillsides and basalt canyons offer some of the most colorful landscapes in the state, especially in the fall. The Yakima River area has many such side canyons. This scene of golden grasses was taken in the Umtanum Creek Canyon near Ellensburg, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. The Quincy Lakes area is part of the scablands of central Washington State. Visitors to this area will experience basalt cliffs, mesas, benches, canyons and potholes. Several of the potholes have become lakes that are filled with water seeping from the irrigation of nearby upslope farmlands. Ancient and Dusty lakes are two examples that have added to fish and wildlife diversity and have also become important recreational areas. Ancient Lake and Dusty Lake are in the Quincy Wildlife Recreation Area near Quincy, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. The senior woman hiker on the trail was photographed at Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

The National Wildlife Refuges are great places to view and photograph wildlife. Often, the natural beauty of these treasured places can be more inspiring than the wildlife that live there. Some of the best landscape pictures are often taken at wildlife refuges. This landscape was photographed from the Frog Lake Trail in the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge near Othello, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

At the end of the last ice age, the great Missoula Flood swept across eastern Washington leaving the unique scablands we see today. Palouse Falls, 198 feet high, remains as one of the magnificent remnants of the flood. As of February 12, 2014, Palouse Falls was named as Washington State's official waterfall. The powerful waterfall is on the Palouse River, a few miles upstream from its confluence with the Snake River. This view of the Palouse River Canyon was captured from Palouse Falls State Park, Washington State, USA.

The scablands of central Washington with their rolling hillsides and basalt canyons offer some of the most colorful landscapes in the state. The Columbia River area has many such side canyons. This scene of the high bluffs overlooking the river was photographed at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

The scablands of central Washington with their rolling hillsides and basalt canyons offer some of the most colorful landscapes in the state. The Columbia River area has many such side canyons. This scene of the high bluffs overlooking the river was photographed at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

At the end of the last ice age, the great Missoula Flood swept across eastern Washington leaving the unique scablands we see today. Palouse Falls, 198 feet high, remains as one of the magnificent remnants of the flood. As of February 12, 2014, Palouse Falls was named as Washington State's official waterfall. The powerful waterfall is on the Palouse River, a few miles upstream from its confluence with the Snake River. This view of the Palouse River Canyon was captured from Palouse Falls State Park, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of the Yakima River was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of a beaver dam on Umtanum Creek was photographed in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Umtanum Creek Canyon in the L. T. Murray State Wildlife Recreation Area between Ellensburg and Yakima, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. This scene of rolling hills was photographed from Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park near Vantage, Washington State, USA.

East of the Cascade Mountains, Washington’s climate is arid and the terrain is desert-like. Summertime temperatures can exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit in regions such as the Yakima Valley and the Columbia River Plateau. This is an area of rolling hills and flatlands. During the last Ice Age, 18,000 to 13,000 years ago, floods flowed across this land, causing massive erosion and leaving carved basalt canyons, waterfalls and coulees known as the Channeled Scablands. The Quincy Lakes area is part of the scablands of central Washington State. Visitors to this area will experience basalt cliffs, mesas, benches, canyons and potholes. Several of the potholes have become lakes that are filled with water seeping from the irrigation of nearby upslope farmlands. Ancient and Dusty lakes are two examples that have added to fish and wildlife diversity and have also become important recreational areas. Ancient Lake and Dusty Lake are in the Quincy Wildlife Recreation Area near Quincy, Washington State, USA.

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