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The Alpaca (Vicugna Pacos) is a species of South American camelid. They descended from the vicuña and is similar to, and often confused with, the llama. Alpacas are often noticeably smaller than llamas and their ears are pointy rather than curved. The two animals are closely related and can be cross-bred. Alpacas were bred for their wool which is similar to sheep's wool. This alpaca was living on a farm in Edgewood, Washington State, USA.

The European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) is not native to North America but has become extremly common since its introduction to New York's Central Park in 1890. The original introduced flock of 60 birds has now spread throughout the continent. This starling was photographed in Edgewood, Washington State, USA.

The House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a year-round resident of North America and the Hawaiian Islands. Male coloration varies in intensity with availability of the berries and fruits in its diet. As a result, the colors range from pale straw-yellow through bright orange to deep red. Adult females have brown upperparts and streaked underparts. This male finch was photographed at Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

Zion Canyon and the Meandering Virgin River at Dusk Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Zion Canyon and the Meandering Virgin River at Dusk Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA. jeff goulden stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

Zion Canyon is a unique and different experience than the Grand Canyon. At Zion, you are standing at the bottom looking up where at the Grand Canyon you are at the top looking down. Zion Canyon is mostly made up of sedimentary rocks, bits and pieces of older rocks that have been deposited in layers after much weathering and erosion. These rock layers tell stories of an ancient ecosystem very different from what Zion looks like today. About 110 – 200 million years ago Zion and the Colorado Plateau were near sea level and were close to the equator. Since then they have been uplifted and eroded to form the scenery we see today. Zion Canyon has had a 10,000-year history of human habitation. Most of this history was not recorded and has been interpreted by archeologists and anthropologist from clues left behind. Archeologists have identified sites and artifacts from the Archaic, Anasazi, Fremont and Southern Paiute cultures. Mormon pioneers settled in the area and began farming in the 1850s. Today, the descendants of both the Paiute and Mormons still live in the area. On November 19, 1919 Zion Canyon was established as a national park. Like a lot of public land, the Zion area benefited from infrastructure work done during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by government sponsored organizations like the Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). During their nine years at Zion the CWA and CCC built trails, parking areas, campgrounds, buildings, fought fires and reduced flooding of the Virgin River. This view of the red rocks of Zion Canyon was photographed from the Emerald Pools Trail in Zion National Park near Springdale, Utah, USA.

Sixty million years ago the west side of Bright Angel Fault was lifted higher than the east side, creating the canyon that we now see. The exposed walls of Bright Angel Canyon allow us to see the geological history of the area. Tropical seas, coastal beaches, sand dunes, swamps, lagoons, and Sahara-like deserts are represented by the horizontal layers that are exposed. The upper five layers of stacked rock records 70 million years of rising and falling sea levels. The limestone layers represent shallow sea environments, sandstone layers mean sandy beaches or dunes, while shale layers translate to mud flats, swamps, or coastal plains. This picture of Bright Angel Canyon was taken at sunrise from Bright Angel Point on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA.

Dallas Peak at 13,815' above sea level is a rock summit in the San Juan mountains of southern Colorado near the Continental Divide. The wide-open landscape is surrounded by many peaks approaching 14,000'. This photograph of a young woman hiker and her dog was taken from the high meadows above Blue Lake in the Mount Sneffels Wilderness near Ridgway, Colorado, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these are Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the snow-capped peaks reflected in a pond was taken from Kachina Wetlands in Kachina Village, Arizona, USA.

Many people identify the typical desert as a vast area covered by sand dunes. That may be true in some parts of the world but in the Mojave, less than one percent of the desert is covered with sand dunes. In order for sand dunes to exist there has to be a source of sand. Also there needs to be winds to move the sands and a place for the sand to collect. The eroded canyons and washes of Death Valley National Park in California provide plenty of sand. The wind seems to blow frequently here, especially in the springtime, and there are a few areas where the sand is trapped by geographic features such as mountains. Mesquite Flats near Stovepipe Wells is one such place. This sunset picture of the sand dunes and the Grapevine Mountains was taken after a winter storm had passed.

Ward and Irene Bradley moved to Puyallup in 1956 and bought 59 acres of peat bog and wetland. After years of excavating and selling the topsoil from the property, a lake was formed. In 1997 the city of Puyallup bought the property and the 12 acre lake with the goal of turning it into a city park. This scene of the lake was photographed on a spring evening. Bradley Lake Park is located on South Hill in Puyallup, Washington State, USA.

The House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a year-round resident of North America and the Hawaiian Islands. Male coloration varies in intensity with availability of the berries and fruits in its diet. As a result, the colors range from pale straw-yellow through bright orange to deep red. Adult females have brown upperparts and streaked underparts. This mating pair, lovingly looking at each other, was photographed in Edgewood, Washington State, USA.

The Red Wolf (Canis rufus) is the worlds most endangered canine. It is a uniquely American wolf, its entire historical range being limited to within the eastern United States. The red wolf subspecies is the product of an ancient genetic mix between the gray wolf and coyote, but is now considered a unique subspecies and worthy of conservation. The red wolf is smaller and thinner than the gray wolf. It is actually gray-black in color, but has a distinctive reddish cast for which it is named. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) started breeding them in captivity in the 1980's. In 1987 the red wolf was reintroduced into the wild but recovery efforts continue to be plagued by political attacks, misconceptions about wolves and weak recovery plans. As a result, red wolf populations are still declining in the wild and they are facing eventual extinction.

Deception Pass Bridge, built in 1934, is a two-lane bridges on State Route 20 between Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands in Washington State, USA. It was a Washington State, Highways project, partially built by young workers from the depression era Civilian Conservation Corps.

The Desert Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos) is a species of lizard native to western North America. They are often called "horny toads", although they are not actually in the same family as toads. Desert horned lizards are distinguished by the large pointed scales at the back of their heads, giving them the appearance of having horns as well as the flat and broad shape of their bodies. This horned lizard was photographed on Campbell Mesa in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Grizzly Bear (Usus Arctos horribilis), also known as the North American Brown Bear, is a large population of brown bear inhabiting North America. They are a very large bear with the male weighing from 400 - 790 pounds and the females from 290 - 400 pounds. The Lewis and Clark expedition named the bear "grisley" but probably meant grisly which means fear-inspiring or gruesome. Although grizzly bears are classified as and have the digestive system of carnivores they eat both plants and animals. They will even eat carrion left behind by other animals. They are very opportunistic feeders eating whatever they can find. Grizzly bears normally hibernate for 5-7 months each year, especially in a colder climate. This grizzly bear was photographed while foraging in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA.

Mount Rainier at 14,410' is the highest peak in the Cascade Range. This image was photographed from the beautiful Paradise Meadows at Mount Rainier National Park in Washington State. The image shows the meadow in full bloom with aster, lupine, bistort and other wildflowers.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park lies where the Great Plains meet the rugged Badlands near Medora, North Dakota, USA. The park's 3 units, linked by the Little Missouri River is a habitat for bison, elk and prairie dogs. The park's namesake, President Teddy Roosevelt once lived in the Maltese Cross Cabin which is now part of the park. This picture of a bison herd (Bison bison) was taken from the Jones Creek area.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park lies where the Great Plains meet the rugged Badlands near Medora, North Dakota, USA. The park's 3 units, linked by the Little Missouri River is a habitat for bison, elk and prairie dogs. The park's namesake, President Teddy Roosevelt once lived in the Maltese Cross Cabin which is now part of the park. This picture of the badlands at sunset was taken from the Painted Canyon Overlook.

The North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis) is a semiaquatic mammal native to North America. It is found in and along the waterways and coasts. An adult North American river otter can weigh up to 18 pounds. This family of river otters was photographed while basking on the bank of the Snake River in Hell's Canyon National Recreation Area near Lewiston, Idaho, USA.

The cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) is the state bird of Arizona. This species of wren is native to the southwestern United States southwards to central Mexico. This wren was photographed perched on a saguaro cactus in the mountains near Tucson, Arizona, USA.

At 14,410' above sea level, Mount Rainier dominates the landscape of the Puget Sound region. Mount Rainier is the highest point in Washington State, and is also the most glaciated mountain in the continental United States. This picture of a housing development near the base of Mount Rainier was taken from Edgewood, Washington State, USA.

The Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a North American sheep named for its large curled horns. An adult ram can weigh up to 300 lb and the horns alone can weigh up to 30 lb. This big old ram with its broken-off horns was photographed on the Grinnell Glacier Trail in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA.

Long's Peak was named in honor of explorer Stephen Harriman Long and is featured on the Colorado state quarter. At 14,259 feet above sea level, the mountain can be seen from a wide area. This photograph of Long's Peak at sunrise was taken from Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA.

The Red Wolf (Canis rufus) is the worlds most endangered canine. It is a uniquely American wolf, its entire historical range being limited to within the eastern United States. The red wolf subspecies is the product of an ancient genetic mix between the gray wolf and coyote, but is now considered a unique subspecies and worthy of conservation. The red wolf is smaller and thinner than the gray wolf. It is actually gray-black in color, but has a distinctive reddish cast for which it is named. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) started breeding them in captivity in the 1980's. In 1987 the red wolf was reintroduced into the wild but recovery efforts continue to be plagued by political attacks, misconceptions about wolves and weak recovery plans. As a result, red wolf populations are still declining in the wild and they are facing eventual extinction.

The Trinity Alps Wilderness is a 525,627-acre national wilderness in northern California. It is contained within and administered by Shasta-Trinity, Klamath, and Six Rivers National Forests. The wilderness is part of the Salmon and Scott Mountains which are subranges of the Klamath Mountains. The high, granite peaks of the eastern half of the wilderness are known as the Trinity Alps. This lush meadow was photographed below Granite Lake. Granite Lake is located in the Trinity Alps near Weaverville, California, USA.

Monument Valley, on the Arizona - Utah border, gives us some of the most iconic and enduring images of the American Southwest. The harsh empty desert is punctuated by many colorful sandstone rock formations. It can be a photographer's dream to capture the ever-changing play of light on the buttes and mesas. Even to the first-time visitor, Monument Valley will probably seem very familiar. This rugged landscape has achieved fame in the movies, advertising and brochures. It has been filmed and photographed countless times over the years. If a movie producer was looking for a landscape that epitomizes the Old West, a better location could not be found. This picture of Mitchell Mesa at sunrise was photographed from John Wayne Point near the Monument Valley Visitor Center north of Kayenta, Arizona, USA.

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of an ancient volcano that erupted millions of years ago, shattering a large mountain and leaving a large crater and surrounding peaks. The tallest of these are Humphreys at 12,637 feet and Agassiz at 12,356 feet. This picture of the snow-capped peaks reflected in a pond was taken from Kachina Wetlands in Kachina Village, Arizona, USA.

Blue Heron Standing on a Rock The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands.  It is the largest of the heron family native to North America.  Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight.  The face and head are white with black stripes.  The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow.  The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America.  East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water.  The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food.  The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds.  Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight.  Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to.  The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole.  The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands.  They build their large nests high up in the trees.  This heron was photographed while standing on a rock by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Blue Heron Standing on a Rock The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while standing on a rock by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while standing on a rock by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The majestic Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is the national symbol of the United States. It is mostly found in the lowland areas near bodies of water. It feeds mostly on fish including spawned out salmon in rivers as well as water birds, geese, carrion and other prey. This eagle was photographed at the Northwest Trek Wildlife Preserve near Eatonville, Washington State, USA.

Lake McDonald is 10 miles long and over a mile wide making it the largest lake in Glacier National Park. It fills a deep valley formed by erosion and glacial activity. Lake McDonald is on the west side of the Continental Divide. The Going-to-the-Sun Road parallels the lake along its southern shoreline. The lake was photographed from Lake McDonald Lodge in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA.

The American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) is the state bird of Washington, Iowa and New Jersey. It is a fairly common summer resident to the Pacific Northwest, migrating to the southern USA and Mexico in the winter. This male with its brilliant yellow and black plumage was photographed in Edgewood, Washington State, USA.

The Common Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus collaris) is a North American species of lizard in the family Crotaphytidae. It is distinguished by its oversized head, colorful body and bands of black around the neck and shoulders. The black bands give it the name “collared”. It is also known as Eastern Collared Lizard, Oklahoma Collared Lizard, Yellow-Headed Lizard and Collared Lizard. The collared lizard can grow to 8-15 inches in length including the tail. They have a large head and powerful jaws. The adult males with their blue green bodies are generally more colorful than the females. The collared lizard is mostly found in the arid, open landscapes of Mexico and south-central United States. They are carnivores, feeding on insects and small vertebrates. Occasionally they may eat plant material. This collared lizard was photographed while basking on warm rocks in Homolovi State Park near Winslow, Arizona, USA.

The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus or Rana catesbeiana) is an amphibious member of the family Ranidae. The bullfrog is native to southern and eastern parts of the United States and Canada, but has been widely introduced across other parts of North, Central and South America, Western Europe, and parts of Asia, and in some areas is regarded as an invasive species. This large frog was found resting among lily pads at the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge near Olympia, Washington State, USA.

Landscape Arch is a 306 foot span of sandstone that has slowly been eroding away for centuries. On September 1, 1991 a 60 foot long slab of the rock peeled away, leaving 180 tons of rock debris below the arch. Landscape Arch is in the Devil's Garden area of Arches National Park near Moab, Utah, USA.

In July of 2019 the Museum Fire of Northern Arizona burned 1,961 acres of Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest. This was caused by a forest-thinning project which was originally undertaken to help prevent devastating wildfires. The fire was started from a piece of heavy equipment striking a rock and sparking the blaze. Nearby neighborhoods were forced to evacuate. According to the National Forest Service, the fire cost $9 million before it was brought under control. This section of burned trees was photographed from the Sunset Trail in the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) is a rabbit native to the American southwest from western Texas north to eastern Montana, and in northern and central Mexico. The cottontail gets its name from the grayish-brown tufted tail. The desert cottontail’s diet consists mainly of forbs and grasses. It can also eat many other plants including cacti. They can be seen foraging for their food in the early morning and evening. Since they get most of their water from plants or dew, they rarely need to drink. On windy days they remain in their burrows because the wind interferes with their ability to hear predators. Cottontails use burrows created by other mammals to give birth to their young. This desert cottontail was photographed near Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

The Liberty Bell was commissioned in 1752 by the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly, and was cast with the lettering "Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof." The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence. Once placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House, the bell today is located in Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. In this picture, Independence Hall can be seen through the window.

Butterflies are some of the most colorful members of the insect family. They can often be photographed while resting and feeding on plants and wildflowers. This endangered Taylor's Checkerspot( Euphydryas editha taylori) was photographed on a Common Yarrow alongside the Iron Bear Trail in Wenatchee National Forest, Washington State, USA.

The American Pika (Ochotona princeps) is an herbivorous, smaller relative of the rabbit. These cute rodents can be found in the mountains of western North America usually above the tree line in large boulder fields. The pika could become the first mammal in United States to be listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a result of global climate change. This pika was found near Mount Fremont, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

The Pacific Crest Trail, officially known as the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, stretches 2,653 miles from the Mexican border to the Canadian Border. It follows the Cascade Range of mountains in Washington, Oregon and Northern California. In Southern California it follows the Sierra Nevada range. The mountains, lakes, meadows and forests along the Pacific Crest Trail are a visual delight in any season. This green forested scene with Dewey Lake was photographed near Chinook Pass, in the William O. Douglas Wilderness, Washington State, USA.

The Pacific Crest Trail, officially known as the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, stretches 2,653 miles from the Mexican border to the Canadian Border. It follows the Cascade Range of mountains in Washington, Oregon and Northern California. In Southern California it follows the Sierra Nevada range. The mountains, lakes, meadows and forests along the Pacific Crest Trail are a visual delight in any season. This colorful fall scene was photographed at Sheep Lake, north of Chinook Pass, in the Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington State, USA.

Palo Alto, California, USA - February 05, 2008: Hoover Tower is a landmark structure on the campus of Stanford University. The 285 feet (87 m) tower houses the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. Hoover Tower was named for Herbert Hoover a Stanford graduate and former president of the United States. Hoover donated a large history collection to create a "library of war, revolution and peace" which is housed in this facility. Stanford University is in Palo Alto, California, USA.

At 14,410' above sea level, Mount Rainier dominates the landscape of the Puget Sound region. Mount Rainier is the highest point in Washington State, and is also the most glaciated mountain in the continental United States. This picture of Mount Rainier was taken at sunset from Edgewood, Washington State, USA.

Blue Heron Hunting by the Water The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images
Blue Heron Hunting by the Water The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. jeff goulden stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird common near open water and wetlands in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is the largest of the heron family native to North America. Blue herons are distinguished by slate-blue colored flight feathers, long legs and a long neck which is curved in flight. The face and head are white with black stripes. The long-pointed bill is a dull yellow. The great blue heron is found throughout most of North America from Alaska through Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. East of the Rocky Mountains herons are migratory and winter in the coastal areas of the Southern United States, Central America, or northern South America. Great blue herons thrive in almost any wetland habitat and rarely venture far from the water. The blue heron spends most of its waking hours hunting for food. The primary food in their diet is small fish. It is also known to feed opportunistically on other small prey such as shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Herons hunt for their food and locate it by sight. Their long legs allow them to feed in deeper waters than other waders are able to. The common hunting technique is to wade slowly through the water and spear their prey with their long, sharp bill. They usually swallow their catch whole. The great blue heron breeds in colonies called rookeries, located close to lakes and wetlands. They build their large nests high up in the trees. This heron was photographed while hunting by Walnut Canyon Lakes in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA.

With the advent of radar, GPS and other advanced navigation tools, lighthouses no longer need to perform the same function they once did; guiding ships to safety. Instead, they have been preserved as historic monuments; reminding us of a time when shipping and sailing were more perilous activities. The Cape Disappointment Lighthouse is located at Cape Disappointment State Park near Ilwaco, Washington State, USA.

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